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lavictoireestlavie

Abrams lower front hull

I am somewhat confused concerning the ballistic models of the Abrams tanks in SB. if the lower front hull (beak) gets penetrated, would it not mean the loss or injury of the driver or damage to the fuel tank system ? I was looking at the LOS diagram of the M1A2 SEP and it has a value of 900+ mm of LOS thickness for the area with the fuel tank and about 600+ mm for the area in front of the driver. Would that 900+ mm value not already include the entire LOS of the beak and and fuel tank, meaning that a perforation of the beak into the fuel tank mean a fuel leak even if the penetrator does not not reach the fighting compartment?

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I just ran a scenario where the right lower front plate of an M1A2 SEP should have been penetrated by an M829A3. The fuel system did not suffer any damage. Unless the lower front plate offers in excess of 800 mm of protection against KE rounds i dont see how the fuel system or the driver were not damaged or injured.

Could somebody please explain this to me?

Edited by lavictoireestlavie

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Thank you dta delta !

Does anyone know how this is modeled in SB ? Should not the fuel tank be damaged once the composite lower front hull in penetrated ?

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Don't worry, fuel leaks are modeled in SB in those frontal areas but it is not a guaranteed chance. Those front fuel tanks are AUXILIARY, meaning that even with a leak in those tanks then the vehicle would still have fuel in its PRIMIARY (the rear) and would continue to operate (albeit without the extra fuel in the front).

That said, we don't know if the crew has a low primary and full auxiliary, so the solution is to just make the chance of a fuel leak on the front fuel tanks as a lower probability (about half).

Unfortunately this is all I am able to explain about it.

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