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Damian90

History of Soviet Tanks.

73 posts in this topic
5 minutes ago, Marko said:

As you correctly stated the Soviets/Russians learned the hard way Tanks and city's towns don't mix there older generation of IFV,s were to lightly Armoured.

 

Not exactly, it was less a technological problem, more problem with training and corruption. Already in Afghanistan Soviet soldiers from rear echelon units, maintnance etc. were trading weapons and other stuff with their enemies, same happend in Chechnya, also troops were poorly trained in many instances, or even higher rank officers made poor battle plans, and decisions during battles.

 

BMPT/BMOP was only partially a solution, but Russians were also observing how US Army, USMC and British Army utilized tanks and other armored vehicles in urban battle zones, and they were learning.

 

8 minutes ago, Marko said:

 there tanks could not elevate the main guns enough. if the TC.s tried to use there AA guns snipers picked them off.

  I have read the Russians used ZSU-23/24 to great effect in Grozny they placed them at the front of there armoured columns to provide very effective support fire. 

 

Using AA vehicle in such way is clever, but it's also a waste of resources, also ZSU-23-4 or 2S6 Tunguzka are thinly armored, and are unable to lead an attack, they mostly stay behind providing covering fire from there.

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35 minutes ago, Damian90 said:

 

Not exactly, it was less a technological problem, more problem with training and corruption. Already in Afghanistan Soviet soldiers from rear echelon units, maintnance etc. were trading weapons and other stuff with their enemies, same happend in Chechnya, also troops were poorly trained in many instances, or even higher rank officers made poor battle plans, and decisions during battles.

 

BMPT/BMOP was only partially a solution, but Russians were also observing how US Army, USMC and British Army utilized tanks and other armored vehicles in urban battle zones, and they were learning.

 

 

Using AA vehicle in such way is clever, but it's also a waste of resources, also ZSU-23-4 or 2S6 Tunguzka are thinly armored, and are unable to lead an attack, they mostly stay behind providing covering fire from there.

Normally I would agree, using your AAA assets for that role would be a waste but remember the Chechens had little or no airpower most of there Air force was Destroyed on the ground before the ground assault started. As you correctly stated  some of troop were well trained and some were not fit for purpose.

In the first assault they lost over a hundred Tanks/IFV,s they assaulted Grozny by driving a column of tanks right in to the centre of the city.

 And suffered very heavy losses. The Chechens had AT teams accompanied by snipes and heavy machine gun teams they where very well prepared

They funnelled the Russian armour in to kill zones. The Russians  assaulted at night with out proper night vision gear and paid the price.   

 

 

 

Edited by Marko

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This time let's talk about Soviet/Russian airborne troops armored fighting vehicles.

 

The primary line are BMD vehicles, BMD stand for Боевая Машина Десанта, literally Combat Vehicle of the Airborne Troops. It's an equivalent of BMP's used by the ground forces. At the moment there are 4 generations of BMD's including also modifications and modernizations.

 

For the Cold War era the most prominent variants were BMD-1 and BMD-2, both differ in armament in similiar way as BMP-1 and BMP-2.

 

Bmd-1_ifv.jpg

 

The BMD-1 actually uses exactly the same turret and armament as BMP-1. However vehicle is smaller and lighter, also it's engine is at the rear, which makes getting in and out rather problematic. The number of dismounts is also smaller.

Vehicle is powered by 241HP 5D-20 diesel engine, vehicle is also equipped with hydropneumatic suspension system.

 

There are several variants of the BMD-1 vehicles.

 

BMD – First production model.
BMD-1 (Ob'yekt 915) – Final production model. It has a dome-shaped NBC filter intake on the right hand side of the center of the hull roof.
BMD-1K (K stands for komandirskaya – command) – Command variant fitted with R-126 and R-107 transceivers, two Clothes Rail antennas and a generator box. It's sometimes called BMD-K.
BMD-1P – BMD-1 modernization with its 9S428 ATGM launcher replaced by pintle-mounted 9P135M-1 ATGM launcher capable of firing 9M113 "Konkurs" (AT-5 Spandrel), 9M113M "Konkurs-M" (AT-5B Spandrel B), 9M111 "Fagot" (AT-4 Spigot) and 9M111-2 "Fagot" (AT-4B Spigot B) ATGMs. Entered service in 1977.
BMD-1PK (K stands for komandirskaya – command) – Command variant of BMD-1P. It is fitted with an additional R-123M radio set, a generator, the GPK-59 gyroscopic compass, the PRKhR radiation and chemical reconnaissance unit and two attachable tables. The machine gun mounted in the left corner of the bow of the hull has been eliminated as well as one of the seats. The crew consists of 6 men. The ammo load was reduced by one 9M113 "Konkurs" (AT-5 Spandrel) ATGM and 250 7.62 mm machine gun rounds.
BMD-1M – BMD-1 with smoke grenade launchers on the rear of the turret, improved ventilation and road wheels.
BMD-1 with its 73 mm 2A28 "Grom" main gun replaced by 30 mm autocannon.
BMD-1 with its 73 mm 2A28 "Grom" main gun replaced by 30 mm AGS-17 "Plamya" automatic grenade launcher.
BMD-1 converted into a mortar carrier.
BMD-1 with turret mounted 2B9 Vasilek mortar.
BMD-1 converted into a self-propelled multiple rocket launcher. The armament was removed and replaced by a vision device. Fitted on top of the turret is a small box-type launcher for 12×80 mm rockets.

BTR-D (Ob'yekt 925) (bronyetransportyor) – Lengthened variant (with 6 rather than 5 road wheels), slightly up-armoured at the front. The BTR-D has no turret, but is armed with two bow-mounted machine guns PKB and can be fitted with pintle-mounted automatic grenade launchers (AGS-17, AGS-30 or AGS-57) and/or machine guns (PKM, 6P41, "Utyos" or "Kord"). Entered service in 1974 and can carry 10 passengers. Combat weight: 8.5 tons.

As we can see some modifications are non official and look more like a field mods, especially from Afghanistan war.

Another variant is BMD-2.

 

Ukrainian_BMD-2_tank_(2).JPG

It received the same armament as BMP-2, but in a newly designed one man turret. Other than that it was nearly unchaged from BMD-1. It was still small, lightly armored lightweight, infantry fighting vehicle.

BTR-D_-_VTTV-Omsk-2009_(1).jpg?uselang=r

This vehicle is BTR-D, an APC variant of BMD-1/BMD-2. Vehicle existed in several different variations, like the one armed with ZU-23-2 AA automatic cannon.

 

Btr-d_Belarus.jpg?uselang=ru

Obviously these vehicles were known for their weaknesses, so development of newer, better protected and larger BMD was started, it was BMD-3.

 

BMD-3_1.jpg

 

The development of this 3rd generation airborne combat vehicle was initiated during the same time frame of the development of the BMP-3. However, the results of the development showed that the mass of the BMP-3 with landing facilities will significantly exceed 20 tonnes limiting an Il-76 to transporting one vehicle. In the early 1980s, the creation of an airborne combat vehicle was initiated. During the design, two options were considered for the BMD-3. The first one included a chassis weighing over 18 tonnes with a 100 mm 2A70 rifled gun and a coaxial 30 mm 2A72 autocannon. The second option was to use the combat module with a 30 mm 2A42 autocannon. Thus, an IL-76 could be loaded either with two airborne combat vehicles weighing 18 tonnes, or three airborne combat vehicles weighing 12.5 tonnes. Research showed that the latter version of the new BMD-3 ran much more efficiently. On the basis of the experience gained and the results of the research, the Council of Ministers of the USSR and the CPSU number 451-159 officially opened the ROC under the code "Bakhcha" on 20 May 1983. Work included the development of an airborne combat vehicle weighing 12.5 tonnes with the Volgograd tractor factory appointed as the head developer.

 

One month later, an agreement was made for the tactical and technical requirements for the new BMD as well as a complete technical design stage. When developing the new BMD, the experience gained in the course of work on the BMD-1 and "Object 934" light tank was used. By 1985, the acceptance testing of three new BMD prototypes was completed. The test results revealed that all the samples exceeded the permissible mass by 190–290 kg and that the running vehicle gave numerous failures. The design bureau VgTZ fixed most of the shortcomings and were eliminated. By May 1986, the refined BMD prototypes completed preliminary tests with three more prototypes developed by the Volgograd tractor factory. These were sent to the state test for another evaluation. New samples exceeded the permissible mass by 400 kg, as they were made subject to measures of improving the reliability of the running transmission gears. The BMD state tests took place between 27 October 1986 and 27 October 1987. According to test results, two to three vehicles were completed and sent to the control tests in different climatic zones conducted from 10 July to 19 November 1988. The conclusion for the "Bakhcha" was assessed as positive with the vehicle fulfilling the tactical and technical requirements set by the airborne troops. On 10 February 1990, the USSR adopted the "Object 950" IFV into service under the designation BMD-3. The serial production of the BMD-3 was then initiated and continued until 1997. Excluding six prototypes produced before 1990, 137 BMD-3s were produced from the year of its adoption to the end of its serial production.

 

The overall dimensions and weight of the BMD-3 are diminutive in comparison to its counterparts. The crew consists of a driver, a vehicle commander, and a gunner and holds four passengers. There are seats for mounted infantrymen in the middle of the hull, with one stowage rack for three 9M111 or 9M113 ATGMs. There are also three racks for ammunitions boxes and a filter-ventilation unit. The commander's seat is on the right of the turret and has a cupola with a hatch cover that opens forward, while the gunner's seat is on the left and has a single-piece hatch cover that opens to the front. Of the four passengers, two are seated at the front with the other two near behind the turret. A firing port is provided on each side of the BMD-3. Additional infantry can be seated for short distances to the immediate rear of the turret with the roof hatch open.

 

 The seats of the combat crew are fastened to the roof of the combat compartments to improve protection from IEDs and mines.[4] The engine compartment is located towards the rear of the BMD-3 consisting of a 450 hp (horsepower) 2V-06-02 water-cooled diesel engine, main clutch, gearbox, final drives and brakes. A collective NBC protection system was provided by over-pressurization of the combat compartment via a filter-ventilation unit to insure the survivability of the crew in an environment contaminated by nuclear fallout.

 

The primary armament of the BMD-3 is the 30 mm 2A42 autocannon in the form of the original BMP-2 turret. This autocannon is mounted on other vehicles, like the Ka-52 and Mi-28. The 2A42 autocannon is a dual selective feed cannon which is fitted with a distinct muzzle brake and manual weapons laying drives increasing accuracy and consistency. This muzzle brake reduces oscillation of the gun mount at the moment of a round being fired. The practical rate of fire is 200-300 rds/min (rounds per minute) while the cyclic rate of fire is over 550 rds/min. It fires rounds with a muzzle velocity of 960 m/s. The BMD-3 has 500 rounds for the 30 mm autocannon ready to be used with an additional 360 stowed inside. The maximum effective range when firing AP-T (armor-piercing-tracer) ammunition is 2000 m, and when firing HE-I (high-explosive-incendiary) ammunition is 4000 m against an area target. A 7.62×54mmR PKT machine gun is mounted coaxially on the right side of the main armament. This coaxial machine gun has a cyclic rate of fire of 800 rds/min and is also equipped with one belt of 2000 rounds. The KBP Instrument Design Bureau offers a drop-in one-man turret, called the Kliver turret, with a stabilized 2A72 30 mm gun, four Kornet ATGM launchers, thermal sights, a coaxial 7.62 mm PKT machine gun, and an improved fire control system.

 

The BMD-3 is equipped with two bow mounted secondary weapons for use against infantry and armored fighting vehicles. Mounted at the front left is a 30 mm AGS-17 automatic grenade launcher. On the front right, a bow mounted 5.45×39mm RPK machine gun can be used. Each of the bow weapons is operated by one of the infantrymen seated in the front of the vehicle. For the AGS-17, there are 290 rounds of ready to use ammunition, with an additional 261 stowed in the BMD-3. The RPK-74 holds 2160 rounds of ready to use ammunition. The 5.45 mm RPK-74 is used for direct engagements up to 800 m, whereas the 30 mm AGS-17 automatic grenade engages and suppresses targets at ranges out to 1,700 m using high-explosive fragmentation grenades. If required, these weapons can also be dismounted from the vehicle.

 

Anti-tank guided weapons (ATGMs) can be operated by the BMD-3. This is made possible by the 9P135M launcher post that fires the wire guided Fagot (NATO reporting name: AT-4 Spigot) and Konkurs (NATO reporting name: AT-5 Spandrel) missiles. The 9P135M launcher is located on the top center of the BMD-3 turret and is dismountable. The crew can engage targets from the vehicle or a distance away from the system. The ATGM launcher has three ready-to-use rounds and two stowed in the vehicle. The Fagot missile is a short range ATGM with an effective range of 2 km. While flying at an average speed of 186 m/s, it penetrates 480 mm of RHA. The Fagot-M is an improved variant that has an increased effective range of 2.5 km and a penetration of 550 mm of RHA. The Konkurs missile has an effective range of 4000 m and flies at an average speed of 206 m/s. The original Konkurs missile penetrates 750–800 mm of RHA while the improved Konkurs-M penetrates 750–800 mm of RHA after ERA due to an additional tandem warhead. The firing range is reduced to 2500 m during night time. A French-German Flame-V adapter kit allows the BMD-3 to launch MILAN ATGMs.

 

A 2E36-3 weapons stabilizer allows the stabilization to be in two planes; the elevation and azimuth. Both the commander and gunner can fire the main armament of the vehicle. Turret traverse is through a full 360° with weapon elevation from -5 to +75°. The high elevation allows it to be used against slow flying aircraft, helicopters, and targets located at higher altitudes. To aim the cannon and the coaxial machine gun at a target, the vehicle is equipped with a BPK-1-42 combined sight type, which incorporates a day channel, a passive and active night channel, and a type PZU-8 day sight. The vehicle’s communication systems features a type R-123M ultra short wave (USW) radio for outside communication and interphone system. A type TPU-124 is used for communication between crew members on board.

 

Options are available to enhance the BMD-3's fire control system, including the SANOET-1 thermal gunner's sight. Thermal sights are also available for the ATGM launcher. The Trakt/1PN65 thermal imaging ATGM night sight has an acquisition range of 2,500 m. The Mulat/1PN86 thermal ATGM night sight, which has a 3,600 m detection range and a 2,000 m identification range, is available for dismounted use.

 

Like its predecessors, the BMD-3 is lightly armored to ensure a high level of mobility. The steel turret and aluminum alloy hull provide the crew's protection against .50 caliber rounds towards the front of the vehicle. Towards the sides and rear of the chassis, protection from small arms fire, shell splinters, and projectile fragments is ensured. The BMD-3 is fitted with automatic fire fighting equipment and over-pressurized NBC protection system. Three electrically operated 81 mm smoke dischargers that fire forwards are located on both sides of the turret providing protection against infrared weapons. A smoke screen can also be created by injecting diesel fuel into the exhaust. A French SNPE explosive reactive armor (ERA) kit is also made available. However, ERA is hazardous for nearby infantry with passive armor being a more practical application.

 

The engine compartment is located in the rear of the vehicle and consists of: a 2V-06-02 water-cooled diesel engine developing 450 hp, a main clutch, a gearbox, a final drives, and brakes. The suspension of the vehicle consists of five rubber-tyred road wheels on each side, a drive sprocket at the rear, an idler at the front, and four track-return rollers. The BMD-3 is fitted with a new hydromechanical transmission with hydrostatic steering mechanism. This adjustable suspension gives a ground clearance between 130 and 530 mm with 450 mm being the default. This hydropneumatic suspension allows the BMD-3 to decrease its height to be able to board transport aircraft like the Il-76M. The ground clearance is adjusted by the driver and it takes 10 seconds to lower or raise the suspension. The maximum road speed is 70 km/h and the maximum off-road speed is 45 km/h. The vehicle can achieve an operational range of up to 500 km on paved roads and can climb up to 60% gradient and move on a 30% side slope. The ground pressure exerted by the BMD-3 is 0.48 kg/cm2 with standard tracks and 0.32 kg/cm2 with broader tracks.

 

The BMD-3 is fully amphibious and is propelled by two water jets mounted one on either side at the rear of the vehicle, allowing the vehicle to achieve speeds of up to 10 km/h in the water and in a sea state of up to three. A snorkel is erected from the driver's position and a trim vane is erected at the front of the vehicle when entering water and the automatic bilge pump is turned on. Unlike its predecessors, the BMD-3 can be airdropped with its all its crews and passengers inside the vehicle, allowing combat engagement to be immediate after landing. For the BMD-1 and BMD-2, the crew would be dropped separately, which required additional time to marry up with their fighting vehicle.

 

BMD-3K – The commander variant of the BMD-3 adopted by the Russian Army in 1996. Mass production of this vehicle was never initiated.
2S25 Sprut-SD (Object 952) – A self-propelled anti-tank gun that entered service in 2005. This vehicle has the chassis of the BMD-3 and is operated by a crew of three. The main armament is the 125 mm 2A75 smoothbore gun which is a variant of the 2A46 smoothbore gun series used by Soviet main battle tanks since the T-64. It can fire the ammunition of the 2A46 including the 9M119 Svir. The chassis has seven road wheels on each side instead of five and the engine is now the 2V-06-2S with a power of 510 hp.
BTR-MD “Rakushka” (Object 955) – A multi-role transport vehicle with bigger hull and no turret. This type can be used to transport troops, fuel, ammunition and wounded personnel. It also serves as the basis for a new range of specialised vehicles for the Russian airborne forces, including a mortar platform and an ambulance.

RKhM-5 (Object 958) – A chemical reconnaissance vehicle introduced in 2011 and is fitted with the same specialized equipment as the BTR-80 version known as the RKhM-4. The turret has been removed; the RKhM-5 has a fixed superstructure with a machine gun turret. The hull is larger allowing it to transport troops, fuel, ammunition and wounded personnel. The VDV successfully completed the testing of the first three vehicles in March 2012.

BMM-D – A command post vehicle and a recovery vehicle. Some variants will have a longer chassis with seven road wheels and probably the same 510 hp engine as the 2S25.

 

The fourth and final generation is BMD-4 and BMD-4M.

The BMD-4 was in itself not fully accepted in to service, and was in the end replaced by upgraded BMD-4M. BMD-4M in itself is unified on components base level with BMP-3.

The main difference between BMD-4/BMD-4M and BMD-3 is main armament.

 

Both primary armaments of the BMD-4 are all fitted into one turret known as the Bakhcha U (Russian: Бахча-У; "Melon field") consisting of: a 100 mm 2A70 rifled gun, a coaxial 30 mm 2A72 autocannon, and a coaxial 7.62 mm PKT machine gun. This module is designed by the KBP Instrument Design Bureau for motorized infantry units without the support of tanks and artillery. The Bakhcha-U turret is installable on the chassis of other military vehicles such as the BMP-2, BMP-3, and BTR-90. This turret has an unlimited traversal of 360° and a maximum elevation of 60°; the maximum depression is −6°. The majority of armored and unarmored targets can be engaged by at least two types of armament provided by the Bakhcha-U turret.

 

The 2A70 rifled gun is capable of firing guided and unguided shells. 34 ready-to-use unguided HE-Frag shells are carried in the turret of the vehicle. The 100 mm gun is fitted with an autoloader that fires at a rate of 10-12 rounds per minute, with the time of each shell loading being 5–6 seconds. The two variants of HE-Frag shells available for the Bakhcha-U are the 3UOF17 and 3UOF19; the former having a muzzle velocity of 250 m/s with the latter achieving 355 m/s. The 3UOF19 also provides a substantially larger proximity detonation which increases the lethal radius of the explosion.[3] When implemented in the Bakhcha-U turret, the 2A70 is capable of effectively hitting targets up to 7 km with its unguided rounds.

 

A 30 mm 2A72 autocannon is mounted coaxially with the 2A70 rifled low pressure gun gun. The turret of the BMD-4 contains a total of 500 rounds ready to be used by its autocannon with 245 of them being high explosive and the remaining being armor-piercing discarding sabot. This autocannon fires projectiles with a muzzle velocity of 1120 m/s and a cyclic rate of fire of 350–400 rds/min. The rounds fired can penetrate 22 mm of Rolled homogeneous armor (RHA) from a range of 2000 m while impacting at an angle of 60°. Minimum gas contamination of the turret is achieved by a delayed unlocking due to single-barrel long recoil action and forward case ejection. The 7.62 mm PKT machine gun is mounted coaxially with 100 mm and 30 mm weapons. 2000 rounds are carried in the turret for the PKT machine gun; all combined into one tape to eliminate reloading.

 

The 100 mm low pressure gun is also capable of firing the 9M117M1 Arkan anti-tank guided missile (ATGM) which is a further development of the 9M117 Bastion (NATO reporting name: AT-10 Stabber). With a weight of 21.5 kg, this ATGM has a penetration value of 750–800 mm of RHA behind explosive reactive armor. The turret holds four 9M117M1 missiles and is launched through the 100 mm gun ensuring a crucial advantage due to the loading being completely internal rather than external unlike other infantry fighting vehicles. While traveling at an average speed of 300 m/s, the Arkan is guided via laser beam riding and is capable of destroying targets up to 5.5 km away. This method of guidance allows it to be stealthy and insusceptible to countermeasures.

 

The BMD-4 features an advanced fire control system (FCS). The unique armament system provided by the Bakhcha-U and the reliable ride performance provided by the chassis gives the BMD-4 qualitatively new capabilities to units of land forces. The BMD-4 is able to fire all its primary armaments effectively regardless of whether the vehicle is stationary or mobile, whether the time is day or night, or whether it is afloat or land based. The FCS implements a significant increase of the armament effectiveness by engaging a wide scope of targets in complicated weather and landscape conditions. Advanced ballistic calculations allow the BMD-4 to fire from an enclosed position and the capability of effectively firing at low and slow aerial targets is provided.

 

The computerized FCS of the BMD-4 is automated by day and night and features two advanced optical sights for both the commander and gunner. The IFV commander's panoramic sight has an azimuth coverage of 360° to search for targets. This panoramic sight features thermal imaging and range finding channels with a range of up to 10 km. The gunner's sight provides for firing all types of armament by day and night with a range finding sight of 10 km. This sight is combined with visual imaging, thermal imaging, range-finding channels, and a missile guidance channel. With two dedicated sights for both operators of the Bakhcha-U, the BMD-4 has hunter-killer capabilities and the gunner is able to use the commander's sight to engage targets if his own sight is disabled or destroyed. The commander of the vehicle also has the ability to override the command and to take control of the turret and gun from the gunner with both turret operators having complete control of the armaments.

 

BMD-4 (Object 960) – Originally designated as the BMD-3M, this vehicle has a modified chassis with new turret known as the "Bakhcha-U". The weaponry bears greater similarity to the BMP-3. This new armament consists of: a 100 mm 2A70 rifled main gun, a 30mm 2A72 autocannon, a 7.62 mm coaxial machine gun, and new "Ramka" fire control system. The bow-mounted AGS-17 has been removed and is replaced with an AGS-30. BMD-4s are newly built or upgraded BMD-3s. The BMD-4 is no longer being purchased for the Russian troops, in favor of the BMD-4M.
BMD-4M – The upgraded variant with a new chassis and the 500 hp UTD-29 engine of the BMP-3. This version will be produced by Kurganmashzavod (KTZ) instead of VgTZ. The vehicle was presented to the VDV in March 2008. According to KTZ, series production could have started in 2009. The BMD-4M was evaluated by the VDV. In August 2011, the evaluation process still wasn't terminated and no firm agreement had been taken as to the delivery of the 10 first vehicles to the VDV, as foreseen in the 2011 state orders. The Russian Defense Ministry decided to adopt the BMD-4M in December 2012.

BTR-MDM – A modernized version of the BTR-MD with the same improvements as the BMD-4M.

2S25M Sprut-SDM1 – Improved variant of 2S25 Sprut-SD with similiar improvements as BMD-4M, also shares new FCS with T-90AM/SM Main Battle Tank.

 

Here is some documentary about VDV (again it's TV Zvezda so talk with grain of salt what they say there) and you can see some stuff about BMD's.

 


A more interesting is 2S25 Sprut-SD and 2S25M Sprut-SDM1.

In it's essence it's a light, airborne capable, apmhibious tank, however it's designation suggests it's a self propelled gun, it's a part of Maskirovka.

Vehicle is armed with 2A75 125mm smoothbore gun, which is a variant of 2A46M 125mm smoothbore gun found in various subvariants on various T tanks. However 2A75 is a long recoil version which means it can be fired by such a lightweight platform.

 

2008_Moscow_Victory_Day_Parade_(59-18).j
 

 

2S25M Sprut-SDM1 is an improved variant.

 

Army2016-293-XL.jpg

Army2016-294-XL.jpg

It received new FCS, thermal shroud for the main gun, commander panoramic sight, and remote weapon station as well as chassis and mobility improvements common to BMD-4M.

 

BTR-MDM_1.JPG?uselang=ru

 

This vehicle is BTR-MDM Rakushka (Clamshell). It's an APC variant, able to carry more troops than standard BMD-4M. There is nothing special about this vehicle, it's unified with BMD-4M and 2S25M, lightly armored and lightly armed.

Of course more variants can appear in future, but this is yet to be seen.

 

Last variant based on BMD-1/BMD-2 is 2S9 Nona-S, which is self propelled mortar.

 

800px-2S9_Nona_in_Saint-Petersburg.jpg

 

Main armament is 120 mm 2A60 mortar, can carry 40-60 rounds, max firing range is 8.8km and 12.8km with special extended range munitions.

 

 

Edited by Damian90

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KMDB and Malyshev factory are manufacturing more new T-84BM Oplot tanks for Thailand. Some more detailed screenshots become avaiable.

 

1cdedbd9c6de.jpg

This is front glacis plate armor module, it combines Duplet ERA with passive armor as the mid layer and backing layer.

2ccb9c09f192.jpg

Later this module is installed on he hull glacis.

 

da21ee357397.jpgdc2a7ccf2cf6.jpg
87b686f1a8fb.jpg340076628fa8.jpg

Hull manufacturing process.

6bb62d6432f6.jpg

 

Turret presenting front composite armor thickness and Duplet ERA modules size.

 

a5547ed4087c.jpg

 

Empty Duplet ERA containers used to protect hull sides.

Edited by Damian90

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I always liked the Sprut.

 

Okay, so, in order to make it drop from an airplane, it has really no armor.

But at least it can shoot you in the face with a huge gun.

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Cursious thing is that 2S25/2S25M, BMD-4/BMD-4M and a like never received ERA 4S24 designed for such lightweight platforms. 4S24 was tested tor BMP-3 but it also never received it.

 

 

028441709-big.jpg?r=0

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By the way @Ssnakesome informations that might be helpfull. T tanks with 2A46 series of 125mm smoothbore guns, have a maximum elevation of +15 degrees and maximum depression of -5 degrees for the main gun, and main gun is loaded at angle of +3 degrees.

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T-72 manual states 

+ 13°47'   and -6°13'  forward

and 

+16°13'  and -3°47'  backwards, basically indicating the turret is angled forward, which it is in steel beasts. 

Edited by dejawolf

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Hey, Andrei Tarasenko updated his site, and some new great informations are included. @cobrabase you might be interested in this, altough in most cases articles are in russian and needs translation.

 

Anyway, first article is about evolution of the armor protection, mainly of the T-64 series.

 

http://btvt.info/3attackdefensemobility/armor.htm

Another article, in english this time, is about development of welded turrets for tanks in Soviet Union.

http://btvt.info/3attackdefensemobility/turret_welded.htm

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2 hours ago, Damian90 said:

Hey, Andrei Tarasenko updated his site, and some new great informations are included. @cobrabase you might be interested in this, altough in most cases articles are in russian and needs translation.

 

Anyway, first article is about evolution of the armor protection, mainly of the T-64 series.

 

http://btvt.info/3attackdefensemobility/armor.htm

Another article, in english this time, is about development of welded turrets for tanks in Soviet Union.

http://btvt.info/3attackdefensemobility/turret_welded.htm

Thank you for this!

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On 12/12/2016 at 4:17 PM, mpow66m said:

Just read T72s & T90s to be equipped w FCS from T14,incl ATT.

 

 

,

Can you link the article please.

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2 hours ago, mpow66m said:

sorry that was 7  months,lost it.

No worries.

It would be interesting to see how much it would improve the T-72 firing accuracy while on the move issues.

The T-72 has a lot of upgrades available but they all have the same issues with gun depression and stabilisation.

 

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On 6/16/2017 at 3:28 AM, Marko said:

No worries.

It would be interesting to see how much it would improve the T-72 firing accuracy while on the move issues.

The T-72 has a lot of upgrades available but they all have the same issues with gun depression and stabilisation.

 

 

if the stab motors are more powerful, it will help. otherwise, it won't help much since T-72 gun is imbalanced.(gun tip heavy)

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1 hour ago, dejawolf said:

 

if the stab motors are more powerful, it will help. otherwise, it won't help much since T-72 gun is imbalanced.(gun tip heavy)

Gun itself is balanced(within certain margin), but turret is not. Since  gun barrel weight  diminishes  due wear with each round fired, gun balance should be checked periodically and adjusted by addition or removal of counterweights.

Edited by Jartsev

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well, maybe the newer gun is more balanced. but original 2A46 was horribly imbalanced. you could feel the imbalance when elevating/depressing the gun. it resisted a lot more when elevating than when depressing. 

breech end is also much shorter on russian tanks than on western tanks, to fit inside the small turret.

Edited by dejawolf

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A Ukrainian version of the BMP-t built on a T-64 Hull

 

 

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Another photo of Object 477A1 "Nota" leaked to the internet. Also based on photos, a model of this vehicle was made.

 

691222_original.jpg

 

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