Jump to content
RomeoNovember12

Just a few questions on the Fulda Gap and 11th ACR/8th Guards Army

Recommended Posts

Hello,

 

A long time since I last wrote here. I have had a long layoff from SB.

 

However I am working on another Hünfeld scenario. There can never be too many, can there? It is set in the autumn of 1982 with an armored cavalry troop delaying an MRR advance guard. I am looking to confirm a few things with all the knowledgeable people here! I want it to be reasonably historically accurate!

 

I chose 1982 because I understand that the 11th used M60A3 TTS at that time, rearming with M1s the next year. Correct? What about M113s and M901s, would they still be the vehicle for the scouts or would they have been replaced with M3s?

 

It is hard to find sources on the 8th Guards Army at that exact point in time. However what I do find is that the 8th Guards used T-62s rearming with T-80s in the late 80's. Correct? 

 

At the moment my scenario starts just west of Rasdorf with the Red Army advancing along highway 84 towards Hünfeld. Is that reasonable?

 

I am thankful for any help!

 

/Mats

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If I remember correctly they didn't start to get Bradleys until '85.  In '82 they still would be using the nine vehicle platoons (3 APC, 2 ITV, 4 Tanks).  They still might have been using M60A1s in '82 as there were not that many 'A3s in country at the time.

Edited by TSe419E

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Servus,

 

1st Squadron got the first M1 1982.

They changed 1986 from M113A2 to M3 Bradleys.

 

cheers

 

D u k e

 

Source: Fahrzeug Profile Nr.29 11. US-Panzeraufklärungsregiment "Blackhorse"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, TSe419E said:

If I remember correctly they didn't start to get Bradleys until '85.  In '82 they still would be using the nine vehicle platoons (3 APC, 2 ITV, 4 Tanks).  They still might have been using M60A1s in '82 as there were not that many 'A3s in country at the time.

what would one have to disable on a A3 for a stand in for the A1?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Also, main gun rounds should be 2/3rds to 3/5ths M774 APFSDS and the rest M456A2 HEAT.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The first few, I don't know how many, had no TTS.  The ones in the training battalion at Ft. Knox when I was there ( summer of '79 to winter of '80) had TTS.  First 'A3s were made in '78.  Don't know when they were issued for use in line units.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have begun Reading US Army Field Manual 17-95 dated 1977. I doesn't even mention T-64 or T-72. Why is that? Were they not known? Or not numerous enough to be judged a threat?

 

EDIT: However it mentions the T-62 a lot.

Edited by RomeoNovember12

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

as i recall, they were still rather unknown to the west- and the differences between the two weren't altogether known yet. superficially they looked similar enough to be the same vehicle to observers. the soviets didn't have a pr program where they introduced them to the world and what you could expect

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Most of the T-64 was learned from pages of the user manual that Russians used on the shitter, ca. 1983 or so. Some "liaison" officer 'salvaged' them on one of his patrols through Eastern Germany. One manual was once stolen out of a motor pool, the same officer then lost his life trying to repeat that stunt with a T-80 a few years later (1987?). By 1986 the T-64B was recognized as the biggest threat of the Russian tank inventory; the T-80 was still a somewhat mythical beast, the T-72 was (mistakenly) thought of a low-cost T-64 model when in fact it simply was a competing design conforming to the same tactical requirements (just like M1 and Leo 2 can be considered fraternal twins).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When I went through basic, summer of '79, they admitted that not much was known of exact details.  T-64s, we were told, were not that many in number, prone to breakdown, dangerous to operate, and therefore mostly used in Russia.  We were told there were more T-72s and how to differentiate between the two but not much else.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×