Operation Fury

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Operation Fury is a campaign created by Volcano.

version I.x
1 FEB 2010
(updated: 3 FEB 2012)

Grenada Flag.png

Contents

Iterations

Operation Fury Test

Operation Fury I

Background

The goal of the Operation Fury campaign is a more advanced campaign that stresses command decision, luck, and the difficulties involved with a smaller more technological force invading and overthrowing a well armed island nation. During the process, both sides are dealing with limited supply, bad luck (FUBAR events), and a BLUEFOR populace that demands results or they will suddenly pull the plug on the invasion.

Basic Rules

The basic rules are rules that every participant should know.

Mission

BLUEFOR is conducting an invasion of the island with the intent of overthrowing the ruling dictator and clearing the area of hostile forces. The campaign ends in an OPFOR victory when either BLUEFOR calls off the invasion either voluntarily or involuntarily (the latter due to War Weariness), or they have been pushed back to their initial bridgehead and overrun (which is determined at the end of each day, starting with the second day). The campaign ends in a BLUEFOR victory when the OPFOR's dictator is overthrown (he resides in the far southwest corner of the island, in an objective that will be labeled "Compound" -- he is overthrown when this objective falls (Grenada: grid 335 269)).

Execution

The invasion itself is based on the modern US Army's Stryker Brigade Combat Team (SBCT) / heavy force concept. That is, in the early stages of an invasion, a light "interim" force is needed and relied upon to conduct the fight until the "heavy force" of tanks and tracked IFVs can arrive. OPFOR is a mixture of low tech and high tech units, in a mixed force of export vehicles that a typical dictatorship might purchase.

In this campaign, a key characteristic is that BLUEFOR begins as a light force that transitions to a heavy force as key objectives are taken and held (ie. port facilities). OPFOR begins as a low tech force but will also gradually gain strength and more high tech units over time, provided that these forces are not squandered. This essentially makes it a race against time for BLUEFOR to secure key areas to bring in better forces, and to hold onto those places to continue to get those reinforcements, and to push forward and conquer the island before events unfold that end the campaign.

Time Limit

Each scenario will last 80 minutes. Once time has expired the scenario will abruptly end. There is no score or evaluation per se, the scenario simply ends and picks up where it left off next time with only the overall result determining which side won or lost. The scenario may also end if a ceasefire occurs.

Time of Day

Time of day marker and day count on the strategic map, currently denoting the morning turn on day 1.

Each scenario takes place in a three turn day of morning, noon, evening (ie. first scenario is morning, second is noon, the third is evening, and the forth is the morning of the next day, and so on).

Map Updates

The level of map updates for the campaign will be set to "own party", meaning that your maps will only show the location of your own friendly forces.

Hasty Planning Time Constraint

The Planning Phase will last a total of 20 minutes and then the scenario will begin regardless of if either side is ready. The HOST starts a timer once all players are in the planning phase map view and starts the mission once 20 minutes has expired after that.

  • Tip: Planning works best when most of it is done before the day that the scenario is to be played, that way all that it needed is the CO to draw the plan on the map and explain it.

Objective Types

There are three types of objectives on the map, Primary, Secondary and Tertiary.

  • Planning should be done to determine which objective should be considered as the "next" objective to take or recapture, and BLUEFOR simply advances towards that area.

Primary

The two main objectives of the campaign, Maurice Bishop IA and the Dictator's Compound.

Primary objectives are the main objectives of the campaign and they are the only objectives that really matter for victory purposes. The most important effect of primary objectives on the campaign is that they determine victory for BLUEFOR. Also, capturing the "dictator's compound" affects War Wariness, which is the gauge used to determine when the campaign will end in an OPFOR victory. The two primary objectives consist of the "dictator's compound" and "airfield 1", which are both denoted on the strategic map as a star shaped icon. The moment Blue simultaneously has ownership of BOTH of these objectives at the end of a scenario, the campaign will end immediately as a BLUEFOR victory.

  • The reason both objectives must be taken is because the dictator moves from one location to the other if one is lost. Taking the Dictator's Compound will result in his final stand at Airfield 1 and vice versa.
OPFOR Primary Objective Effects


Challenger 2, 2 vehicles: [dictator's compound]


Secondary

A secondary objective, town 4 - Sauteurs (small port).

Secondary objectives are the heart of the campaign; they provide important effects on the campaign when captured or lost. These objectives are denoted on the campaign map and game map as a solid circle. The most important effect of secondary objectives on the campaign is that they, like primary objectives, affect War Wariness, which is the gauge used to determine when the campaign will end in an OPFOR victory. Also, once these objectives are taken, an event occurs in the campaign. The most common event that occurs is the loss or gain of a particular type of reinforcements. Airfields are one example of secondary objectives and reinforcement centers (ports, towns and military camps) are another.

  • Airfields do not provide reinforcements per se, but they do affect air support for both sides. See the "Air support" section under both BLUEFOR and OPFOR sections.

The specific reinforcements provided by secondary objectives are:

BLUEFOR Secondary Objective Effects


M2A2(ODS) reinforcement (per day), 6 vehicles: [town 4 (small port)]

M1A2(SEP) reinforcement (per day), 3 vehicles: [industrial 1 (large port)]

OPFOR Secondary Objective Effects


T-55A reinforcement (per day), 12 vehicles: [industrial area 1]

T-72B1 m.2012 reinforcement (per day), 6 vehicles: [industrial area 2]

BMP-2 reinforcement (per day), 3 vehicles: [large military camp]

BTR-70 reinforcement (per day), 3 vehicles: [small military camp]

Technical RCL reinforcement (per day), 1 x 4 = 4 vehicles: [towns 1, 2, 3 & 4], (1 vehicle for each)

  • Keep in mind that although BLUEFOR would not get additional reinforcements for controlling industrial area 2 (for example), the capture of that area would deny OPFOR the reinforcements that comes from that region, which makes capturing this place and others like it crippling to OPFOR's defense.

Tertiary

A tertiary objective, village 7 - Gouyave.

Tertiary objectives are things like villages, which do not directly provide any important effect on the campaign when captured or lost, other than reducing the insurgent forces that OPFOR has at its disposal. These objectives should not be ignored since OPFOR's special insurgent type units will be reduced and destroyed if BLUEFOR can take many of these objectives.

OPFOR Tertiary Objective Effects


Rifle squad (9 men ea. w/ RPG 7): [villages 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12], (maximum of 9 squads at any given time (one company))


Temporary Ceasefire

At any point in a scenario, the BLUEFOR and OPFOR overall commander may request a temporary ceasefire. This is done by activating trigger 1. A message is then announced to both sides that a cease fire is requested. If the other side activates or has already activated their trigger 1 (their request for a ceasefire), then the scenario will come to an immediate end. The setup for the next weeks scenario is then taken from this end state, so a ceasefire simply allows the option for both sides to mutually agree to end the mission before the time limit has expired.

  • A message will be displayed on both sides when a ceasefire request is made, and when it has been accepted. Keep in mind that one side can request a ceasefire, and then change their mind. If this occurs, it will appear as if the event is broken - but it will only end if both sides have the trigger set simultaneously. It is cautioned that the Host should never artificially terminate the scenario early as this will mean that the random events at the end of the scenario will not occur.

Chain of Command (the "CO equivalent")

In this campaign, the basic chain of command in a company is determined by the same hierarchy that Steel Beasts uses, however command is exclusively restricted to non-support vehicles. In other words, if the CO vehicle is eliminated the next in line of command of a company is the XO vehicle, followed by the 1st vehicle of the 1st platoon, then the 1st vehicle of the 2nd platoon, then the 1st vehicle of the 3rd platoon, and so on restarting with the 2nd vehicle of the 1st platoon and so forth. In the absence of a CO vehicle, the "CO equivalent" is used to determine front line trace at a greatly reduced efficiency level.

NOTE: Support vehicles can never act as a CO equivalent; if a company only has support vehicles remaining then it will not have a CO until it is replaced.

Advanced Rules

The advanced rules are good for everyone to know, however it is only vital that the CO and XO of each side references and understand these rules (no one needs to memorize them as many of them are only used once, or only at certain times).

Logistics (maintenance, supply, Critical Command/Supply Failure)

Supply and maintenance is assumed to be conducted automatically during the night hours between the evening and morning scenario of each day. Supply is considered to be brought up from various supply sources and then distributed to your units by the HEMMT/Ural fueler and HEMMT/GAZ supply trucks. Essentially the fueler and supply trucks are your source of supply and, as such, are the second most important units in the campaign (the CO being the most important).

Supply

Resupply occurs automatically given that certain conditions are met:

  1. On the morning of each day, all insurgent and non-isolated regular units begin with 100% fuel and ammo, provided that they have at least one fueler (HEMMT or Ural) AND one supply (HEMMT or GAZ) truck available that they can trace a line to without passing into enemy controlled territory
  2. On the noon turn of each day, all units will start with 60% fuel and all non-ADA vehicles start with 60% ammo (.6)
  3. On the evening turn of each day, all units will start with 40% fuel and all non-ADA vehicles start with 40% ammo (.6 again)

Ammo reduction is taken from the semi-ready storage as much as possible. Fueler and supply trucks can be used to resupply units during scenarios, but their primary role is to conduct the abstract resupply procedure during the night (on the morning turn), which is always carried out as long as at least one of them is alive and has a clear supply line to friendly units.

Isolation

Isolation is the act of cutting off non-insurgent unit(s) from the rest of their forces and can be an effective strategic method of destroying the enemy (and, because of this, taking regions) by preventing enemy units from resupplying.

The criteria for isolation is as follows:

  1. The unit is NOT an OPFOR rifle squad or OPFOR technical (these are insurgents and can never be isolated)
  2. The unit CANNOT trace a line to a friendly fueler and supply truck without passing through enemy controlled territory

On the morning turn of each day, all non-insurgent units that fulfill the criteria for being in isolation are considered to be isolated. Isolated units receive only 10% of their fuel and ammo for each turn thereafter until they are no longer isolated, at which point they receive the normal fuel and ammo supply level for that given period/turn of the day.

  • It is important to note that given the above rule, "isolation" can only occur on the morning turn supply check. Isolation that occurs throughout the course of the day's three scenarios has no real consequence unless the condition still exists on the morning turn of the following day. This means that units who are not yet officially "isolated", but meet the requirements of being isolated, should probably attempt to breakout (or be relieved) on the evening turn at all costs to avoid being truly isolated on the morning turn of the next day.

Maintenance

As long as certain maintenance vehicles are present, maintenance automatically occurs. The basic rules and conditions about maintenance are:

  1. Once all the M88/Wisent ARVs and M113 Repair vehicles on one side are destroyed, then all units for that side will begin each scenario with random light damage.
  2. Drowned vehicles are recovered in the next scenario, as long as that side has at least one M88/Wisent ARV. Once the side no longer has one then all drowned vehicles are considered destroyed.
  3. M113 Repair vehicles are replaced as part of the Critical Supply Failure event, but M88/Wisent MRVs are never replaced. This means that the above effect of random light damage is temporary until the next Critical Supply Failure event occurs (if it ever does), while the loss of M88/Wisent ARV and the inability to recover drowned vehicles is permanent.

Critical Command/Supply Failure

When one side suffers a loss of command vehicles or supply vehicles then either a Critical Command Failure or Critical Supply Failure will result on the first turn of the following day.

Needless to say, Critical Command/Supply Failure events are disastrous, as it can cause a shift in momentum in the campaign and each event has different consequences. Specifically these events are:

Critical Command Failure

Once one company loses its command (CO) vehicle, then a Critical Command Failure occurs. Once this is true then on the morning turn of the next day the War Weariness scale is adjusted accordingly and the appropriate CO vehicle is replaced. This event is cumulative for each CO vehicle that must be replaced.

In other words, the consequences of a Critical Command Failure are that eliminated COs have a drastically smaller ZOC when determining front line trace, and multiple COs lost can stack into several adjustments of the War Weariness scale.
Critical Supply Failure

Once a side either no fueler OR no cargo trucks available, then a Critical Supply Failure has occurred. When either case is true then on the morning of the next day that side receives 1/3 of its normal reinforcements for that day (but a minimum of one vehicle/troop squad of each type) and instead receives all missing vehicles from the SUPPORT DETACHMENT (see the "Reinforcements, re-consolidation and starting forces" section below for a list of all the support vehicles which would be replaced in the SUPPORT DETACHMENT). This event is not cumulative (for example, if both fueler and cargo trucks are lost in the same day, you do not receive less than 1/3 reinforcements nor is the War Weariness scale adjusted twice).

In other words, the consequences of a Critical Supply Failure are a large shift in the War Weariness scale and a drastic decrease in replacements for the day, however this event does not stack and its occurrence should be rare.

Mechanized Infantry (Troops) Replacements

The infantry belonging to a mechanized unit will be removed when the entire team is eliminated. As long as a unit is in supply, mechanized troops are all replaced at the end of the day. This means that in the evening turn you can conduct all out assaults and hold to the last man with mechanized infantry forces, because non-isolated units will have them all replaced on the morning (next) turn.

  • NOTE: if the carrier vehicle is killed then its troops will only get removed from the campaign if there is no other carrier vehicle in the same company to move them to (because it is not possible to have mechanized infantry squads without a vehicle, and because it is too much of a hassle to keep track of individual orphaned mechanized infantry teams with regular troop units). The judgement of how many troop squads are carried over to the next scenario is abstract and is based solely at the discretion of the Game Master; in every possible case the simplest solution is taken.

Forces (reinforcements, re-consolidation and starting forces)

In each morning scenario, with the exception of the very first, deployment zones will be present for units within each company (by color) to allow them to redeploy slightly and to represent night activities of consolidation. On morning turns, additional reinforcements will be added if applicable. Reinforcements are placed in their parent companies' deployment zones, they are considered to have moved up to the front during the night.

BLUEFOR

Know your enemy: this is the highly trained and well equipped BLUEFOR rifleman.

BLUEFOR, or Blue, is the aggressor in this campaign, the invasion/liberation force.

Reinforcements

Reinforcements are awarded on the morning turn (except the first). On the morning turns, the placement of these normal reinforcements are in its parent company's deployment zone (if applicable). The assignment of BLUEFOR reinforcement vehicles to a "parent company" is determined solely by the Game Master under a specified and uniform approach where each non-isolated company gets an identical amount of reinforcements. If a company is in isolation, that company would get no reinforcement vehicles assigned to it and the non-isolated companies would get the even division of reinforcements. Single vehicles are combined into platoon formations of 4 vehicles as much as possible.

  • NOTE: ASLAV-25 replacements are always assigned to Recon Troop, and the Recon Troop does not get any other vehicle type assigned to it.

This reinforcement method means that BLUEFOR may have company organizations that have a greater strength than the others because relative company strengths are not considered when assigning reinforcements; this is intentional as it allows the offensive to have direction with the strongest companies, rather than spreading the strength out across several weak companies. Note that BLUFORs replacement method differs from OPFOR's method. OPFOR receives replacements in a replenishment type fashion where weakest companies are brought up to strength, then additional units are spread evenly after that. This results in each company having generally the same uniform strength and organization which intentionally better helps them defend on a broad front.

Some BLUEFOR reinforcements are always awarded by default, while others are awarded only if a specific area is currently under their control. Where applicable, the objective(s) that BLUEFOR must hold to get certain reinforcements is listed in brackets below:

ALL previously eliminated mechanized infantry squads: DEFAULT
M1128 MGS [Centauro], 12 vehicles (w/ PPTFS DM 63C LS & HEAT ME-456A1): DEFAULT
  • Four M1128 MGS assigned to each line company.
ASLAV-25, 8 vehicles (w/ M919 APFSDS-T): DEFAULT
  • All are assigned to the Recce Troop.
M1126 Stryker [Piranha IIIC w/ Lemur 40mm AGL + Pilar], 3 vehicles: DEFAULT
  • One M1126 Stryker assigned to each line company.
M2A2(ODS), 6 vehicles (w/ M919 APFSDS-T & TOW-2B): [town 4 (small port)]
  • Two M2A2(ODS) assigned to each line company.
M1A2(SEP), 3 vehicles (w/ M829A3, MPAT & M1028 Canister): [industrial 1 (large port)]
  • One M1A2(SEP) assigned to each line company.


Starting Force
Ground units:

(M1128 MGS is represented by Centauro and M1126 Stryker is represted by Piranha-IIIC)

Amphibious landing option
3 REINFORCED LINE COMPANY TEAMS (A, B, C) composed of M1128 MGS (3 PLTs of 3 vehs), M1126 Stryker (1 PLT of 4 vehs w/ UGVs), M1128 MGS CO & XO, and supporting vehicles of FISTV, M88 ARV, Medic, UAV (each company gets one CO & XO, FISTV, M88 ARV, Medic, and UAV (when static SAM level permits))
  • The starting strength of 3 vehicles per MGS platoon is based on real world MGS platoon strengths in US Army.
(For more information on the different landing options, see: Initial Invasion Selection)
Airborne landing option
3 LINE COMPANY TEAMS (A, B, C) composed of M1128 MGS (1 PLTs of 3 vehs), M1126 Stryker (3 PLT of 4 vehs w/ UGVs), M1128 MGS CO & XO, and supporting vehicles of FISTV, M88 ARV, Medic, UAV (each company gets one CO & XO, FISTV, M88 ARV, Medic, and UAV (when static SAM level permits))
  • The starting strength of 3 vehicles per MGS platoon is based on real world MGS platoon strengths in US Army.

1 AIRBORNE INFANTRY COMPANY (Airborne) composed of 4 rifle platoons, 2 ATGM team (Spike LR), 2 HMG team, all in fortified positions and under AI control
(For more information on the different landing options, see: Initial Invasion Selection)
Either (Amphibious OR Airborne) landing options
1 RECON TROOP (Recon) of ASLAV-25 (3 PLTs of 4 vehs)

1 SUPPORT DETACHMENT (Support) of 2S9 ADA (2 vehs), HEMMT fuel & supply mix (6 vehs, 3 vehs each); M113 ENG (2 vehs); M113 Repair (2 vehs); Beiber (4 vehs) --this organization is the one that is replenished when a Critical Supply Failure occurs, along with all missing FISTVs of each company.
  • BLUEFOR's SUPPORT DETACHMENT shows up on turn 2 (1200 on day 1).
  • The company assignment of A, B, C (line) and Recon (recon) will always be maintained.
  • BLUEFOR RPG type is NLAW.

ARTY support:
18 tubes ICM, HE and smoke until all FISTVs are destroyed, at which point it becomes 12 tubes of HE only. FISTVs are only replaced when a Critical Supply Failure occurs.

AIR support:
Airstrikes not present at start due to the presence of OPFOR SAM protection. Airstrikes become available when OPFOR static SAM sites are reduced, thus lowering the OPFOR SAM Level. Each morning, after an ENY airfield has been taken, and if OPFOR's SAM Level is low enough, AH-64 Apache support becomes available (1 veh for each airfield taken) with AGM-114K.
  • There can only be a maximum of 2 attack helicopters available at any one time; no record is kept of surplus/excess.

OPFOR

Know your enemy: this is the resilient OPFOR irregular.

OPFOR, or Red, is the defending force.

Reinforcements

Reinforcements are awarded on the morning turn (except the first). On the morning turns, the placement of these normal reinforcements are in its parent company's deployment zone (where applicable). The assignment of OPFOR reinforcement vehicles to a "parent company" is determined solely by the Game Master under a replenish type approach of the simple condition that every non-isolated company is given a vehicle, with the company that has the lowest strength of that vehicle TYPE (ie. T-72B1, BTR-70, etc.) first getting brought up to match the strength of the next weakest company, and so on. Single vehicles are combined into platoon formations of 3 vehicles as much as possible.

This reinforcement method means that uniformity in strength is intentionally stressed at all times. Although the three OPFOR companies start out with different organizations, over time they will all become an evenly balanced force and their company type names become words on paper. Note that OPFORs replacement method differs from BLUEFOR's method. BLUEFOR receives replacements in a round robin type fashion, where relative company strengths are not considered. This can result in some companies having a greater strength than others.

Nearly all OPFOR reinforcements are awarded only if a specific area is currently under their control. If these areas are lost, OPFOR no longer receives those specific reinforcements so fight hard to hold these areas. The area(s) that OPFOR must hold to get certain reinforcements is listed in brackets below:

ALL previously eliminated mechanized infantry squads: DEFAULT
BRDM-2, 6 vehicles: DEFAULT
Challenger 2E w/default load, 2 vehicles: [dictator's compound]
T-55, 12 vehicles: [industrial area 1]
T-72B1 m.2012, 6 vehicles: [industrial area 2]
BMP-2, 3 vehicles: [large military camp]
BTR-70, 3 vehicles: [small military camp]
Technical RCL, 4 vehicles: [towns 1, 2, 3 & 4], (1 vehicle for each region)
Rifle squad (9 men ea. w/ 6x RPG 7L): [villages 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12], (maximum of 9 squads at any given time (one company))
  • Rifle squads and Technicals are special cases. These units are all assigned to the "Insurgent" company, which is the insurgent force. The units in this company have an invisible deployment zone that extends almost everywhere along the front line (including the neutral zone).

Starting force
Ground units:

(T-90 is represented by Leopard 2A4)

1 REINFORCED TANK COMPANY (Guards) of T-90 (3 PLTs of 3 vehs), CV90/35-NL (1 PLT of 3 vehs), T-90 CO, BRDM-2 (1 PLT of 3 vehs) and supporting vehicles of Wisent ARV, Medic

2 MOTORIZED RIFLE COMPANIES (1 Mot. Rifle, 2 Mot. Rifle) of T-72B1 m.2012 (1 PLT of 3 vehs), BTR-70 (2 PLTs of 3 vehs), BRDM-2 (1 PLT of 3 vehs), T-72B1 m.2012 CO and supporting vehicles of Wisent ARV, Medic (each company gets one CO, Wisent ARV, Medic)

1 SUPPORT DETACHMENT (Support) of 2S9 ADA (2 vehs), ZSU-23-4 AAA (2 vehs), Ural fueler & GAZ supply pair (6 vehs, 3 vehs each), M113 Repair (2 vehs), MT-55 (3 vehs) --this organization is the one that is replenished when a Critical Supply Failure occurs.
  • Note that the differences in vehicle types between the starting force and the reinforcements that Red will receive later. The intentional differences might mean that some starting unit types cannot be replaced: once they are lost they are gone forever (ie. T-90 and CV90/35-DK). In the case of co/Guards, it is replaced by a T-72B1 when it is replaced after a Critical Command Failure.
  • The company assignment of Guards, 1 Mot. Rifle, 2 Mot. Rifle will always be maintained.
  • OPFOR RPG type is RPG-7L.

ARTY support:
1 ARTILLERY COMPANY (Artillery) of 12 2S1 self propelled guns (2 batteries of 6) are present on them map from the start, which represent OPFOR's artillery support, which is capable of firing HE and smoke. Once all 2S1s are lost, no more artillery is available.
  • Unlike BLUEFOR, OPFOR is not limited to calling artillery with FO vehicles only, OPFOR's limitation is that their artillery is on map and can be destroyed (their artillery easier to coordinate but vulnerable).

AIR support:
Airstrikes are available at start and remain available as long as both airfields are under friendly control. Once ONE airfield is lost, airstrike capability is also lost. ENY airstrikes are not present at start due to OPFOR SAM protection but they will gain airstrikes once OPFOR's SAM sites are reduced. Starting on the second day, each morning Mi-24 Hind E support becomes available, 1 veh for each airfield under friendly control (with NO troops assigned to it).
  • There can only be a maximum of 2 attack helicopters available at any one time; no record is kept of surplus/excess.

Determination of Front Line Trace, Deployment Zones, and Objective Ownership

Front Line Trace Determination

The underlying condition in regards to front line trace and objective ownership is that no terrain changes ownership unless the opposing side specifically pushes forward in that area with a CO in the vicinity. In this way, both sides can use forces to screen a flank and not need to keep a CO vehicle in the area to retain front line ownership, unless of course the enemy pushes a CO forward in that flank. In the case of the latter, the opposing side would need to match that CO with a CO of their own in that sector (or keep the enemy CO from moving forward), in order to keep the enemy from pushing the front line forward in that area.

Summarized

The summarized version of how the front line trace is calculated is this:

All COs project a "zone of control" (ZOC) and this zone of control is what determines the front line's location. Actual CO units project large ZOCs, while CO equivalents (their temporary replacements) project small ZOCs (1/2 the actual CO unit's normal size). The front line trace is carefully determined at the end of each scenario by a complex procedure of plotting circles which represent ZOCs, along with plotting lines, all of which are based around CO or CO equivalent vehicle ending locations. Their relation to each other on opposing sides is then compared, along with their relation to the old front line positions. An actual front line trace line (gray dashed line) is plotted when the ZOCs and ZOC connecting lines of opposing sides overlap, and then a 500m neutral/buffer zone is established on either side of this to from the final "new" front line trace for the next scenario. In cases where two opposing CO ZOCs overlap, any infantry units in the overlapping area will help override the median line split (in other words, infantry can help influence the front line trace where two opposing CO ZOCs are overlapping). Where where both sides have infantry they will cancel each other out to a average depth.
  • At a minimum, all you really need to know about how the front line trace is determined is that COs play the main factor in its determination as a method to ensure that they remain close to, but not necessarily in the middle of, the front line of fighting. Infantry play a secondary factor in the determination in contested zones.
Full Procedure (v2)

The actual procedure is complicated. Should you wish to know the full procedure, it consists of the following step by step process in sequence:

An example of how the process of the front line trace is established between scenarios. (v1)
(Step 1 - Establishing the old front line) The front line trace line (dashed gray line) is changed to a solid line for reference purpose (it will get removed later).
  • NOTE: The front line trace in the first scenario is the shore of the island.
(Step 2 - BLUEFOR ZOC determination) BLUEFOR's CO locations (or CO equivalent in the absence of a CO) are marked by blue color circles which are centered on each BLUEFOR CO's ending position (the center of the circle is the CO's position). The radius of the circle for ACTUAL CO UNITS is exactly 2km, and for CO EQUIVALENT units it is exactly 1km.
  • The CO and CO equivalent rings are referred to as "zones of control" (ZOC).
(Step 3 - OPFOR ZOC determination) The procedure in step 2 is repeated for OPFOR's CO locations. OPFOR's ZOCs are then copied over to the blue side too help determine contested areas and actual front line trace.
(Step 4 - Contested areas, median line) In areas where a red or blue circle (ZOC) overlaps or protrudes beyond the original/previous front line trace black line, then the front line WILL be altered. If this is the case, a black "median line" is plotted down the center of where opposing ZOCs lines overlap. However, if infantry of either side are present where red and blue circle (ZOC) overlap, those infantry will override the median line's position; the line will instead be drawn where troops are positioned and intermixed opposing troops will cancel each other out to an average depth.
  • The end result is that oppositional overlaps where no infantry are present are split evenly down the center, but infantry override the even split.
(Step 5 - Actual front line trace determination) In the areas where NEITHER a red or blue circle overlaps or touches the original front line trace (solid gray line, step 1), then the front line in those non-contested areas remains unchanged. The front line is now re-drawn as a dashed gray line across the old unchanged area and then connected to the black median line that was drawn in Step 4. Once complete, this dashed gray line is the ACTUAL FRONT LINE TRACE. !This line is what is used to determine objective ownership!
(Step 6 - Neutral zone determination) A neutral zone of ~1000m is established on both sides of the dashed gray "actual front line trace" line, by drawing a red and blue dashed line which are parallel and offset from the actual front line trace by ~500m on either side of it. These red and blue dashed lines are now the front line for each side with the area in between being the actual neutral zone.
(Step 7 - Clean up) The ZOC circles, old front line trace's solid gray line, and black median line are all removed. The remaining three front line graphics are now copied to the other side. Once complete, only the following graphics from the above process will appear on the map:
dashed gray line = actual front line trace
dashed blue line = BLUEFOR front line
dashed red line = OPFOR front line
(the area between the BLUEFOR and OPFOR front line) = neutral zone
  • The reason this 7 step process places such great importance on the CO vehicle is so that it prevents the COs from being able to "hang out" far in the rear and never be at risk. This behavior is important to discourage this behavior since there are several negative aspects that occur when a CO is lost. In other words, this mechanic forces the CO to be near the fight, with the bold COs gaining the most ground at the risk of disaster and the timid COs at risk of losing ground but playing it safe.

Deployment Zone Determination

After the front line trace has been determined, deployment zones are established within friendly territory. For each side, every company organization receives their own deployment zone. The position of this deployment zone is determined in the process of determining the front line trace. Basically, the position of a company's CO (or CO equivalent in the absence of a CO) determines where a box, measuring roughly 2km in all direction, is placed centered around that point and oriented towards the front line trace as much as possible. The deployment zone is cut off when it reaches the front line trace for that side so that the deployment zone will typically extend away from the front line by 1-2km in most cases.

After the deployment zone is created, all units belonging to that company are consolidated within the deployment zone (the exception is with OPFOR Insurgent Company and BLUEFOR Recon Troop, see below). Support vehicles and helicopters are consolidated in a centrally located position with its own deployment zone that is 2km in diameter. OPFOR artillery have a 2km deployment zone roughly around their previous location(s), averaged, one deployment zone for each battery. Units that are in isolation are never consolidated.

  • Exception 1: OPFOR's rifle squads, civilian cars, and technicals belong to the Insurgent Company and can deploy in OPFOR's territory and anywhere inside the neutral zone and are NEVER in isolation (these are insurgent forces and may be deployed into and out of isolated pockets).
  • Exception 2: BLUEFOR Recon Troops's deployment zone is anywhere along BLUEFOR's front line, within a ~1km buffer.

Objective Ownership Determination

Objective ownership is determined by the actual front line trace line (the gray dashed line). In the case where the actual front line trace travels through an objective, ownership does NOT change hands from the previous owner until the front line is established BEYOND the objective. Objectives in the "neutral zone" retain the current affiliation / ownership.

  • In other words, the objective circle must be completely consumed by the actual front line trace before it is changes hands.
Eliminating Isolated Pockets of Enemy (special case)

If a pocket of isolated enemy units is eliminated in the course of a scenario and the front line is still maintained beyond this isolated pocket of resistance by the end of that scenario (so that the pocket is now empty of enemy and the front line is beyond it), all the territory and objectives within the pocket are handed over to opposing side.

Initial Invasion Selection

An invasion beach, Darvi Beach.

When the campaign begins, the BLUEFOR CO is able to choose ONE selection of starting attack locations (either one of the invasion beaches or the airfield) in which to begin the invasion; this chooses the starting location of the campaign's first scenario. OPFOR also secretly selects TWO invasion beaches to defend (the airfield need not be chosen since it is always selected). The two OPFOR beach selections (and the automatic airfield selection) determines where OPFOR's two motorized rifle companies will be initially deployed (one on each of the selected beach areas, or both at the airfield if BLUEFOR invades at the airport). OPFOR's tank company always begins the campaign in a deployment zone far to the rear of the first scenario's map.

  • If BLUEFOR chooses to invade at the airfield then they will be much closer to securing the major port at the start of the campaign, but OPFOR will always be prepared for the invasion since it takes quite some time to land the planes carrying the vehicles. Also, an airfield landing will result in BLUEFOR having a lighter initial invasion force (see: Starting Forces). In other words, this option carries a penalty for BLUEFOR of complete loss of surprise and a lighter initial force to start the battle, and a benefit of starting the campaign in the heart of OPFOR's defenses.

Initial Invasion Deployment Zones and Defenses

In the case of a beach invasion, BLUEFOR vehicles arrive together at the selected invasion area. BLUEFOR starts with a consolidated deployment zone on a narrow strip of land on the beach and 500 meters deep, where 1/2 of all the line companies begin (one platoon of M1128 MGS, one platoon of M1126 Stryker). ASLAV-25s begin in the water behind the beach, one platoon from each company starts on the beach with a platoon from each company spawning on the beach every 5 minutes. OPFOR's two forward deployed companies have only a 1km deployment zone (instead of the normal 2km deployment zone), which is centered on the beach of their selection about 500m from the shore.

The airfield landing, Pearl Airport.

In the case of the airfield invasion, BLUEFOR airborne infantry start dug in around the airfield, the Recon company's ASLAV-25s start deployed with the airborne infantry in a deployment zone around the perimeter. One M1128 MGS platoon from each company starts on the airfield itself with a platoon from each company spawning on the airfield every 5 minutes. OPFOR's two forward deployed companies have a normal 2km deployment zone on either side of the airfield.

In both cases, both forward deployed OPFOR companies receive ONE deployable minefield (advanced, not buried), TWO deployable obstacles (steel beams), SIX deployable bunkers, and a battle position for EACH tank.

SAM Level Effects (static SAM sites)

SAM site icon on the strategic map.

There are three OPFOR static surface-to-air (SAM) installations on the map. The presence of these sites prevents certain levels of BLUEFOR aerial support from being available until the sites are destroyed and the SAM Level is reduced.

SAM Level gauge on the strategic map, currently denoting SAM Level RED.

The current SAM Level is represented by a meter on the Strategic Map.


The restrictions on BLUEFOR aerial support is as follows:

# of operational SAM sites BLUEFOR aerial support restriction
3, SAM level: RED No BLUEFOR aerial assets allowed (no UAVs, airstrikes, or helicopters)
2, SAM level: AMBER BLUEFOR airstrikes allowed
1, SAM level: YELLOW BLUEFOR airstrikes and UAVs allowed
0, SAM level: GREEN BLUEFOR airstrikes, UAVs, and helicopters allowed


In order for BLUEFOR to eliminate an OPFOR static SAM site, the site must be both captured by ground forces and all ADA vehicles on the site must be eliminated. Once the static SAM site is destroyed, it is permanently removed and can never be replaced (ie. OPFOR does not get the site back if they take back the area).

War Weariness (involuntary withdrawal of BLUEFOR)

War Weariness gauge on the strategic map, currently denoting War Weariness level 1.

War Weariness is a scale that is used to measure how long the conflict has gone on without any meaningful progress from the point of view of the invader's home government. In other words, it is used as a gauge to measure how "popular" the war is on the aggressor side's home front, with an unpopular war seeing an abrupt and involuntary end. Once the War Weariness reaches "10", the campaign ends immediately in a Red victory (Blue calls off the invasion due to unpopular public support back home).

  • Take heed that operational planning and tempo MUST be planned around this meter; it matters not what the position of the front line is if the meter reaches 10 before Blue can achieve victory, the result is still a Blue withdrawal/Red victory in this case. The manipulation of the War Weariness Meter is the single most important aspect to a successful campaign for both sides: BLUEFOR must keep it as low as possible to ensure that the invasion will not suddenly be called off and OPFOR's primary objective (and method of winning) is to force it to "10".
  • In rare instances it might be true that the War Weariness meter reaches "10" at the end of the same day that BLUEFOR has captured and held both the Dictator's Compound and Airfield 1. If this occurs, then the campaign ends in a Draw (BLUEFOR has successfully removed the dictator, but public opinion of the war is so bad that it negates the victory -- essentially a Pyrrhic victory).

Factors That Affect War Weariness

At the end of each day (after the evening "1730" turn has been resolved), the War Weariness Meter may rise or fall depending on what has occurred during the day. Basically, positive increases are bad for BLUEFOR, negative increases are bad for OPFOR. The factors that influence War Weariness are:

+2 After each day. Time marches on, and BLUEFOR's public approval constantly declines; this means that providing there are no negative movements and no other positive movements of the meter, the campaign has a maximum of 15 turns, (3 turns in a day x 5 movements of the War Weariness gauge from 1 to 10).

+1 If BLUEFOR has not captured and held a NEW non-Tertiary type objective during that day (the politicians demand progress!).
  • A "NEW" objective is defined as an objective that BLUEFOR has not yet captured, ie. it is not an objective that has been retaken. Objectives are all marked with a * when BLUEFOR has taken them the first time, thus denoting that they are no longer "new".

+1 For each BLUEFOR Critical Command Failure during that day (basically, +1 for each CO vehicle that must be replaced). This is cumulative, it can happen several times per day.

+2 If BLUEFOR suffered from a Critical Supply Failure during that day. This event is not cumulative, it can only happen once per day.

-2 If BLUEFOR has captured the Dictator's Compound during that day.

-1 For each OPFOR Critical Command Failure during that day (basically, +1 for each CO vehicle that must be replaced). This is cumulative, it can happen several times per day.

-2 If OPFOR suffered from a Critical Supply Failure during that day. This event is not cumulative, it can only happen once per day.

NOTE: Going by the above conditions, it is easy to see that emphasis is placed on BLUEFOR maintaining forward momentum to NEW substantial objectives, and time is not on BLUEFOR's side. Simply retaking old ground will not stave off the increase in War Weariness. Essentially BLUEFOR is forced to resolve the campaign or else its democratic government will pull out and bring their troops back home before the job is done.

SNAFU Table

At the end of each scenario, just before time has expired, a random event occurs which determines whether or not a SNAFU has occurred. A SNAFU is an unforeseen and unplanned event that occurs that must be dealt with, and it takes effect in the next scenario. It represents the chaos and unpredictability of war, luck, and the general need to be flexible and deal with the cards that you have been dealt. It is, as they say in the military, the uncontrolled element that forces you to adapt.

The following events occur in the next scenario. They are carried out once in the next scenario and are not repeated unless the same SNAFU roll occurs again.

  • For example, a loss of artillery support means that it happens in that next scenario; the scenario after that the artillery would return unless the same event occurred again.

BLUEFOR SNAFU Fate Roll (1-10)

The following results of the BLUEFOR SNAFU fate roll applies only to the BLUEFOR side:
Roll Event Effect
1 Lady Luck smiles. No effect!
2 A helicopter has crashed. BLUEFOR loses one helicopter permanently. If no helicopter is available, you cannot escape fate: "The plane has crashed into the F'n mountain"; airstrikes are temporarily lost. If neither is available, Mars is angry: temporarily lose all artillery support.
3 A breakdown in command and control has occurred. BLUEFOR loses all artillery support for the next scenario. NOTE: This does not apply to airstrikes.
4 OPFOR has time to prepare defenses between the battle. In the next scenario, OPFOR will receive single tier vehicle battle positions, bunkers, and one deployable minefield FOR EACH COMPANY. NOTE: The ones that are located within BLUEFOR held territory at the end of a mission are removed.
5 Bad weather has occurred. Ground conditions will deteriorate to slow mobility and all helicopters and airstrikes are unavailable.
6 Low end vehicle deadlines. The stress of combat causes TWO light vehicles to be deadlined with severe maintenance failures. BLUEFOR permanently loses TWO reconnaissance vehicles (ASLAV-25). If TWO are not available, you cannot escape fate: one APC is lost. If there are no APCs available, one IFV is lost. If there are no IFVs available, one NON CO tank is lost.
7 The dreaded "vehicle Gremlins" strike in unison. BLUEFOR has random light damage applied to all vehicles.
8 The local populace has provided information about our strength and rough location to the enemy. OPFOR map updates will be set to "Enabled" for the next scenario (ie. they will have full map updates). Also, all BLUEFOR forces start next scenario exposed to enemy so that their starting strength is known and BLUEFOR's deployment zones are shown to the enemy so that a rough estimate on where they will concentrate can be made.
9 Command and control confusion has caused orders to be misunderstood and intents to be misinterpreted. The front line units have given up ground by mistake. BLUEFOR's front line and/or deployment zones in the next scenario are further back from where they would normally be (CO equivalent zones of control are used for all COs, which is 1/2 the normal zone of control radius). NOTE: Depending on the presence of enemy COs, the effect of this SNAFU roll means that some terrain may be lost, or the only side effect may be that our deployment zones are further back. Most likely it will be a combination of both.
10 High end vehicle deadline. The stress of combat causes one valuable vehicle to be deadlined with severe maintenance failures. BLUEFOR permanently loses ONE non-CO tank. If no tanks are available, you cannot escape fate: ONE non-CO IFV is lost. If no IFVs are available, TWO APCs are lost. If no APCs are available, TWO reconnaissance vehicles are lost.

OPFOR SNAFU Fate Roll (1-10)

The following results of the OPFOR SNAFU fate roll applies only to the OPFOR side:
Roll Event Effect
1 Lady Luck smiles. No effect!
2 A helicopter has crashed. OPFOR loses one helicopter permanently. If no helicopter is available, you cannot escape fate: "The plane has crashed into the F'n mountain"; airstrikes are temporarily lost. If neither is available, Mars is angry: temporarily lose all artillery support.
3 Our artillery is suppressed by counter battery fire. OPFOR loses all artillery support for the next scenario. NOTE: This does not apply to airstrikes.
4 Enemy deception and tactical movement has caused our forces to relocate and remain at the ready with engines running, increasing our fuel consumption levels. OPFOR vehicle fuel level is 1/3 of what it would normally be for that scenario (ie. 30%, 20%, 6%) and isolated units have 0% fuel.
5 Our benevolent dictator's political officers have decided to "purge" the officer ranks and replace them with more politically loyal commanders. OPFOR map updates will be set to "Disabled" for the next scenario (ie. there will be no map updates).
6 Low end vehicle deadlines. The stress of combat causes TWO light vehicles to be deadlined with severe maintenance failures. OPFOR permanently loses two reconnaissance vehicles (BRDM-2). If TWO are not available, you cannot escape fate: one APC is lost. If there are no APCs available, one IFV is lost. If there are no IFVs available, a NON CO tank is lost.
7 The dreaded "vehicle Gremlins" strike in unison. Random Light damage on all vehicles.
8 Enemy reconnaissance aircraft have overflown the island and reported our unit locations. All OPFOR forces start next scenario exposed to enemy so that their starting strength is known. Also, OPFOR's deployment zones are shown to the enemy so that a rough estimate on where they will concentrate can be made.
9 Command and control has been temporarily lost with the front line units, they have fallen back in panic and given up extra ground to the enemy. Front line and/or deployment zones in the next scenario are further back from where it would normally be (CO equivalent zones of control are used for all COs, which is 1/2 the normal zone of control radius). NOTE: Depending on the presence of enemy COs, the effect of this SNAFU roll means that some terrain may be lost, or the only side effect may be that our deployment zones are further back. Most likely it will be a combination of both.
10 High end vehicle deadline. The stress of combat causes one heavy vehicle to be deadlined with severe maintenance failures. OPFOR permanently loses ONE non-CO tank. If no tanks are available, you cannot escape fate: ONE non-CO IFV is lost. If no IFVs are available, TWO APCs are lost. If no APCs are available, TWO reconnaissance vehicles are lost.

Weather

The weather in Operation Fury is determined at random. Bad weather occurs as a random roll on the BLUEFOR SNAFU table (see #5), which represents rain showers that cause the ground to get soft for one third of the day. Repeated bad weather would be rare, but not impossible if the same roll occurs, so the weather will be generally good throughout the campaign. On the other hand, visibility will change throughout the campaign at random which is decided by a random roll which occurs at the end of the scenario, when the SNAFU rolls occur. The visibility can theoretically drop and stay low for a while if luck is consistently bad.

Visibility Table

60% chance that the visibility will remain unchanged (from the previous scenario)
20% chance that the visibility will increase "one level" (~+500m)
20% chance that the visibility will decrease "one level" (~-500m)

  • This means that the visibility will generally stay the same, although extreme cases of chance may determine that the visibility might decrease to very low levels, or increase to maximum.
  • Visibility at the start of the campaign is set to a moderate level of 3000m.

Considerations and Tips

This section has various tips and considerations that each side should read in order to help them be successful in the campaign.

  • Time is NOT on BLUEFOR's side. The OPFOR's hope at winning the campaign resides in forcing the campaign into stagnation, which gradually pushing the War Weariness scale higher and higher. OPFOR's best chance at forcing stagnation is of course to mount a successful defense, but also to gather strength from reinforcements to a point where it can counter attack, or to a point where BLUEFOR has a difficult time advancing the front line in any direction. Combine the possibility of occasional crippling defeats inflicted on BLUEFOR (through loss of a CO, thus triggering the Critical Command Failure event), and gradually the War Weariness scale will reach its limit.
  • BLUEFOR should become increasing bold once the War Weariness scale is in the orange color range. At this point, BLUEFOR needs to seek out and destroy OPFOR's command and supply vehicles and/or try to push on to the main objective.
  • Take care of your units, what you keep alive will return in the next scenario. Always remember that reinforcements do not become available until the morning of the next day, so you are stuck with what you have for an entire day.
  • Attack towards areas which will yield more reinforcements or deny the enemy reinforcements. Above all it is imperative for BLUEFOR to take either town 4 OR industrial 1 on the first day in order to secure critical heavy reinforcements. BLUEFOR can probably still manage to win without taking either on the first day, as long as they take them both by the second day and greatly reduce OPFOR's forces on the first day.
  • BLUEFOR should be realistic during the initial stages and not strive for a lighting advance, and should instead strive to immediately reduce OPFOR sources of reinforcements so that OPFOR does not gradually gain in strength to the degree that BLUEFOR cannot continue their advance. Basically, bite off small pieces of the defense at a time. It is intentional that a Blue force that is consistently attritioned, and which does not take OPFOR sources of reinforcements, will gradually become overwhelmed. The initial period of the invasion is critical.
  • Both sides should be cautious with their heavy vehicles; they should not be expended carelessly since there is only a slim ratio in daily (default) heavy vehicle reinforcements between both sides. Considering that, through ownership of certain objectives, BLUEFOR gains more powerful units and OPFOR also loses reinforcements; it is key that both sides conserve their forces and only commit "the good stuff" at the right moment.
  • BLUEFOR may want to pace their advance rate / success rate so that they can gradually take key objectives each day, rather than taking many objectives in one day, and none on the following day. Keep in mind though that pushing the map in certain directions may yield objectives ownership by default all at once; there is no avoiding this other than trying not to advance in such a way that you do not pace yourself.
  • Both sides should avoid "stacking up" their respective CO vehicles all in one place. Since the front line is determined by CO positioning, spreading the COs out will ensure a better chance at maintaining and extending the front line. Stacking up CO vehicles in one area does not do any good since it leaves the flanks open to allow the enemy to push terrain ownership forward easily, and whether you have one CO or three COs stacked in once place, the effects on front line determination are the same.
  • Avoid leaving your CO too far behind the fight or you will lose some ground regardless of what went on in the scenario before. This unfortunate event can be viewed as "the fortunes of war"; territory is lost during the reorganization period that occurs between each battles, perhaps because of a break down in the chain of command (it can be explained any number of ways). Basically, when trying to take or hold territory, try to keep the CO about 2km (at most) behind your forward units. The intentional dilemma here is that bold COs will gain the most territory but risk disaster in the process, and cautious COs avoid disaster but will likely give up more ground to the enemy.
  • Taking an objective usually consists of at least two phases. In the first phase the attacker advances up to and usually into the objective, and depending on the CO location at the end of the scenario, this usually causes the objective to be situated in the "neutral zone" in the next scenario, which makes it harder for the owning side to defend. In the second phase, the attacker pushes into and beyond the objective (bypassing is usually the best approach), and depending on the CO location at the end of the scenario, this usually causes the objective to be consumed by the front line and will result in it being captured.
  • Keep in mind that the objective ownership stresses a more methodical approach to taking objectives, rather than an approach where you pile in the most vehicles and units at the end of the scenario. This also works both ways, in contested areas it will take time for BLUEFOR to capture objectives as the front line has to be pushed beyond it, but also OPFOR is not able to easily take objectives back by rushing in insignificant forces behind the lines.

Administrative Action

These rules in their entirety are subject to change. The Game Master (the creator of the campaign) reserves the right to make adjustments to the rules as necessary to iron out imperfections, and for the sake of clarity. Some rules may have to be rewritten in the middle of a campaign if the Game Master's intent was not properly conveyed in the initial writing of the rule. This will be done at a bare minimum and only in an emergency to keep the entire campaign from possible derailment.

Three Golden Rules

The three most important rules of the campaign are:

1) The Game Master and co-Game Master's final decision is THE LAW.

2) Adjustments to the campaign will be made by the Game Master and co-Game Master as necessary to correct imperfections and possible issues of "balance" as the Game Master becomes aware of them.

3) The intent of the campaign is to have fun and build the community. If at any time a participant in the campaign is detracting from either of these intents, that participant will be banned from the campaign.

Administrative Process

The basic administrative process in the campaign resolves around two individuals, the Game Master and the co-Game Master (his administrative assistant). The Game Master and co-Game Master must play on opposite sides and are forbidden from being the overall CO for either side; they are merely a cross between a participant and an observer. If there isn't a specified co-Game Master, then the Game Master will alternate between each side from week to week, and the respective COs can assign units to him as desired. The Game Master and co-Game Master may be a company or platoon commander on a side, or may simply choose to be an "extra" that just observes (from the Observer position). This process leaves an admin on both sides, or features a rotating admin on each side, out of the key overall command position to help ensure fair and impartial adjustments (if necessary) to the campaign.

The administrative process occurs when complaints and concerns of the participants are sent up the chain of command.

Administrative Chain of Command

The administrative chain of command in the campaign is as follows:

Game Master and co-Game Master Red and Blue overall COs Participants

Concerns from participants should be addressed to their overall commander, who then decides what is valid and what is not, then the valid concerns are passed on to the Game Master or co-Game Master (whichever one is playing on your side). The Game Master and co-Gamemaster then discuss issues in the Feedback Session where the administrative decisions will be made.

Feedback Session

The Feedback Session is where both the Game Master and co-Game Master has a meeting to discuss issues in the campaign. During a feedback session, the Game Master and co-Game Master attempt to come to an agreement on whether the issue in question is valid. If the issue is valid then the Game Master and co-Game Master will attempt to come to an agreement on the corrective action. If no mutual agreement can be made in either of these steps then no changes are made. Some examples of administrative action that might be agreed upon are (but are not limited to) force reductions, rule changes, rule clarifications/rewordings, the banning of a participant from the campaign, the termination of the campaign, the reinstatement of lost units, a change to reinforcements, a change to War Weariness level, map positioning, map theme changes and so on.

  • It is important to note that no participant nor overall CO is permitted to be present in the Feedback Session. The meeting and decision making is resolved solely by the Game Master and co-Game Master.
  • Topics of discussion between the Game Master and co-Game Master does not always have to be submitted to them by the participants, most issues will be brought up from note taking by both the Game Master and co-Game Master.

Force Reductions

The most important form of Administrative Action that may be invoked (as needed) is the practice of force reduction. Force reduction is the act of reducing the amount of units in a scenario if it is deemed that the number of units exceeds a practical limit to a point where lag starts to detract from the experience. If the number of units begins to exceed this limit (which is determined at the discretion of the Game Master), then a force reduction will occur. When this happens, the ratio of Blue to Red units of that given type are calculated, and both sides are reduced by the same percentage. Any case of the minority side getting reduced to fractions of a vehicle, those fractions are rounded to the nearest EVEN NUMBER (ie. 13.5 rounds to 14 as does 14.5, and 12.5 rounds to 12, etc.).

  • For example, lets say that Red has somehow accumulated 40 tanks throughout the campaign. Blue only has 15 tanks. The Game Master decides that Red must be reduced to 30 tanks to keep the number of units from getting out of control, and removes 10 of them. This is a 25% reduction of Red's tanks, so Blue receives the same 25%. In the example this means that Blue is reduced to 11.25 tanks, which is rounded to 11 tanks. The end result of the force reduction would then be that Red starts the next mission with 30 tanks, Blue starts the next mission with 11 tanks.
  • COs will be notified when a force reduction occurs. This notification may come early, or it may happen in the Planning Phase of that scenario where the change was made. Every effort will be made to notify the CO as early as possible though.