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Swordsmandk

Thursday 24th March 1800 UTC (1900 DK): PLT CO Class

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Time: 1800 UTC http://www.timeanddate.com/worldclock/fixedtime.html?msg=PLT+CO+Class&iso=20160324T18&p1=%3A&ah=4

Place: Kanium TS (old uk armor ts) teamspeak3.i3d.net:10077

What are we doing:

 

1. Small PLT leader training session - very basic stuff!!

2. Small mission after where we try to use what we learned.

 

http://www.kanium.eu/phpBB3/viewtopic.php?f=102&t=3648

 

More info on Kanium forum on the adjenda. You do not have to log in. Its public access.

 

EDIT: Accidentally deleted the other post! Still learning new forum O.o

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Sitting in ts waiting ............. I really have nothing to do today ........ok forgetting dishes i mean

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Well hopefully Zaphod's head isn't exploding from all the information and the unending wave of "another thing ..." :)

 

Its good to see training going on and trying to bring the skill levels up, for those who want to do more then "blow sh*t up" (which in itself is still a valid reason for playing).

 

Whenever I can I'll drop in and try to help out without interfering too much I hope.

 

For those for whom this was in the middle of the night, we usually do similar things in BG ANZAC when new people come along and we are now developing a series of training scenarios to build people's confidence leading Tk, Mech, Recon or Ech forces and build on the basic vehiclecraft type knowledge.

 

Who'd have thought Steel Beasts would be a good tool for AFV crew training and small unit leadership training???  ;)

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15 hours ago, Gibsonm said:

Well hopefully Zaphod's head isn't exploding from all the information and the unending wave of "another thing ..." :)

 

 

Well I'd be surprised if it wasn't! I'm sure you'll agree there's a lot more to teaching than simply knowing your stuff. For what it's worth, when I was 'taught to teach',(both in the military and civvy street) the procedure was as follows:

 

1. Explain to the student what the lesson will cover.

2. Brief the student on what he will learn and how he will learn it.

3. DEMONSTRATE whatever it is you are teaching so he can see and hear how it is done correctly. THIS IS REALLY IMPORTANT

4. Invite the student to replicate what you have done, stressiing that you will help and advise during this first attempt.

5. Debrief and give the student the opportunity to ask questions.

6. Invite student to have another go - this time without any help or advice from you.

7. Debrief

8. Rinse and repeat as necessary within time constraints.

9. Resist the 'And another thing... ' temptation at all costs. If you don't, you run the risk of information overload, resulting in him forgetting essential parts of the lesson.

9. For Lesson 2, recap on lesson 1 before proceeding as he has probably forgotten at least some of it.

The two 'imperfections' last night concerned items 3 and 9 IMHO. But overall it was a good job.

AsI'm sure as a current military trainer you can add useful information to the above. :)

Edited by Tjay

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As the focused student in this case it was stressful to concentrate on every detail and apply it. (with a siv as a brain that didn't help)  So many details to apply all while you communicate your intent. I was sweating through it all. I believe a relaxed practice helps to have these lessons bubble up to the surface sort to say. I had two quick games with Ratt right after and feel more comfortable in that roll. Mind you not all was applied with the scenarios chosen, it was more to have fun.
 

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Just to add , the experience and patience of all involved was a plus. Forgive me for not mentioning it sooner.

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5 hours ago, Zaphod said:

As the focused student in this case it was stressful to concentrate on every detail and apply it. (with a siv as a brain that didn't help)  So many details to apply all while you communicate your intent. I was sweating through it all. I believe a relaxed practice helps to have these lessons bubble up to the surface sort to say. I had two quick games with Ratt right after and feel more comfortable in that roll. Mind you not all was applied with the scenarios chosen, it was more to have fun.
 

 

Well as I've told you. The army takes a lot of time to create a Troop leader, and even after the training, and a few in field missions he will still mot be up to the speed of the rest of the troop who have many years on him. The tp WO (2/ i/c) has the most, and if the New Tp LDR is smart will take the advice from the crusty old WO/Sgt and he will do fine.

The TP Wo has been trained from a driver/gunner all the way up to and included to the Troop leader position after many years, along with many exercise and missions, his knowledge is vast.

So for anyone thinking leading a Troop is easily learned is a bit foolish.

Other nations do it differently, I believe And correct me here, that the US army trains crew commanders (TC) from the start?

 

Keep up the training you will do fine

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8 hours ago, Tjay said:

Well I'd be surprised if it wasn't! I'm sure you'll agree there's a lot more to teaching than simply knowing your stuff. For what it's worth, when I was 'taught to teach',(both in the military and civvy street) the procedure was as follows:

 

1. Explain to the student what the lesson will cover.

2. Brief the student on what he will learn and how he will learn it.

3. DEMONSTRATE whatever it is you are teaching so he can see and hear how it is done correctly. THIS IS REALLY IMPORTANT

4. Invite the student to replicate what you have done, stressiing that you will help and advise during this first attempt.

5. Debrief and give the student the opportunity to ask questions.

6. Invite student to have another go - this time without any help or advice from you.

7. Debrief

8. Rinse and repeat as necessary within time constraints.

9. Resist the 'And another thing... ' temptation at all costs. If you don't, you run the risk of information overload, resulting in him forgetting essential parts of the lesson.

9. For Lesson 2, recap on lesson 1 before proceeding as he has probably forgotten at least some of it.

The two 'imperfections' last night concerned items 3 and 9 IMHO. But overall it was a good job.

AsI'm sure as a current military trainer you can add useful information to the above. :)

 

 

If you had stayed you'd have noticed the tempo / rate of imparting information dropped.

 

And indeed Explain Demonstrate Practice was done.

 

It was acknowledged that this was in experimental "first run" and that the format would likely change in future iterations.

 

Unfortunately you weren't there to witness this after your early departure.

Edited by Gibsonm
Typo

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