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Panzer_Leader

Contemporary Russian Tank Battalion TO&E

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Hi Guys

I was reading the chapter 'Post-war Deployment of Russian Forces in Abkhazia and South Ossetia' in the book 'Tanks of August' on the Russo-Georgia war I've previously posted about and it mentions in late 2009 the tank battalion of the 131st Independent Motorized Rifle Brigade was equipped with a total of 41 new T-90As (see attachment). The number of 41 tanks is mentioned again later in the same chapter in relation to a different unit and this new organisation differs from the Soviet-era tank battalion establishment of 31 tanks.

My best guess is that the TO&E is now 3 companies with 4 platoons of 3x tanks plus 1x command tank each (39) and a battalion headquarters of 2x tanks (41). Of course, the battalion's organisation could be different. Is anyone able to confirm what the organisation of a contemporary Russian tank battalion with 41 tanks is?

I'll be looking to play around with this new organisation for OPFOR in my scenario development.

Cheers

56e83cc269a55_TanksofAugustp.117_rar.dae

Tanks of August p.117.rar

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Like Zipuli wrote- 4 tank coys plus 1 or 2 tanks for Bn HQ. But also keep in mind, that reinforced tank battalions organic to mechanized infantry regiments and brigades had in 80s-early 90s 39 tanks in 3 companies plus Bn Co vehicle(3 platoons of 4 tanks and Coy CO vehicle per company).

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Thanks guys, a fourth tank company of 10x tanks makes much more sense. It's a significant increase in combat power so I'll be interested to see what difference it makes, especially using modern tank variants such as T-80U or T-72M4 (as T-72BA or T-90A substitute).

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Looking into this a little more I've found a couple of helpful websites outlining the new Russian brigade structure, which includes the tank battalion of 41 tanks:

They're both public domain and I can't confirm their accuracy but they are in general agreement with each other. Anyway, they should be good enough for anyone wishing to develop scenarios representing a contemporary OPFOR.

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Researching the contemporary Russian brigade TOE in more detail I came across this helpful document by the same Russian think tank that published ‘The Tanks of August’ covering lessons of the Russo-Georgia War: https://dl.dropbox.com/u/71686353/Russia%27s%20New%20Army_Centre%20for%20Analysis%20of%20Strategies%20and%20Technologies_2011.pdf

The chapter ‘Reform of the Russian Army’ covers the process of trial and error the Russian army has gone through since 2008 to determine its current Brigade structure. Pages 23-24 also describe the individual battalions and companies making up the Brigade organisation, which complements the links in the previous post.

The chapter ‘Russian Military Doctrine and the State of its Armed Forces: Theories and Reality’ compares current doctrine to the ability of the Russian military to execute. There are also chapters on the reorganisation of the Airborne Troops, Air Force and Navy for those interested though I haven’t read those sections.

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The Cold War Soviet tank battalion had several different forms depending on where it was operating:

As part of a Tank Regiment of a Division, it had 31 tanks, HQ plus 3 Ten strong tank companies. (3 platoons of three vehicles, plus HQ)

As part of the Motor Rifle Regiment, it had 40 tanks, HQ plus 3 Thirteen strong tank companies. (3 platoons of four vehicles, plus HQ)

As part of the MRD there was an independent (non Regt) Tank Battalion - 51 tanks, HQ plus 5 Ten strong tank companies.

The final form is in and part of an Independent Tank Regiment or Independent Brigade, where the strength is sometimes given as 41 tanks, HQ plus 4 Ten strong tank companies. This form seems to be that used by the formation referred in the OP.

There are also some archaic Heavy Tank structures, with 5 strong tank companies (HQ plus two platoons of two vehicles), but these would have last been used in the era of the IS3/T10/T10M and aren't relevant in modern/semi-modern contexts.

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Looking into this a little more I've found a couple of helpful websites outlining the new Russian brigade structure, which includes the tank battalion of 41 tanks:

They're both public domain and I can't confirm their accuracy but they are in general agreement with each other. Anyway, they should be good enough for anyone wishing to develop scenarios representing a contemporary OPFOR.

Another question regarding the contemporary Russian brigade for those of the forum who know more about it than me: in the first link above it says the brigade contains two battalions of self-propelled artillery comprising three batteries of 152 mm 2S19 / 2S3M or 122 mm 2S1 each. Does anyone know what the breakdown between battalions and/or batteries of the 152 mm and 122 mm types would be, i.e. are the battalions all 152 mm or all 122 mm or do the batteries within battalions comprise guns of different calibres? My assumption is that, for relative ease of logistics, all batteries within a battalion would consist of guns of the same calibre. Also, does the 122 mm 2S1 remain common in the Russian Army or is it gradually being phased out in favour of the 152 mm 2S19 and 2S3M?

Thanks in advance! :thumbup:

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Another question regarding the contemporary Russian brigade for those of the forum who know more about it than me: in the first link above it says the brigade contains two battalions of self-propelled artillery comprising three batteries of 152 mm 2S19 / 2S3M or 122 mm 2S1 each. Does anyone know what the breakdown between battalions and/or batteries of the 152 mm and 122 mm types would be, i.e. are the battalions all 152 mm or all 122 mm or do the batteries within battalions comprise guns of different calibres? My assumption is that, for relative ease of logistics, all batteries within a battalion would consist of guns of the same calibre. Also, does the 122 mm 2S1 remain common in the Russian Army or is it gradually being phased out in favour of the 152 mm 2S19 and 2S3M?

Thanks in advance! :thumbup:

According to one of TOEs, leaked in 2009, SPH battalion should have 3 batteries of 152mm howitzers, 2 firing platoons x3 vehicles each. Units are allowed to use 2S3 till replacement by 2S19.

Phase-out of 122mm systems was announced a couple of years ago, but how this meets with reality is a big question(especially if take on to account recent odd efforts to resurrect regiments and divisions).

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According to one of TOEs, leaked in 2009, SPH battalion should have 3 batteries of 152mm howitzers, 2 firing platoons x3 vehicles each. Units are allowed to use 2S3 till replacement by 2S19.

Phase-out of 122mm systems was announced a couple of years ago, but how this meets with reality is a big question(especially if take on to account recent odd efforts to resurrect regiments and divisions).

Thanks Jartsev, I can always rely on a helpful answer from you where Soviet and Russian tables of organisation and equipment are concerned!

Cheers mate :drink:

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Coverage of the Russian intervention in Ukraine has shed some light on the composition of Russia's contemporary tank force I thought others may also be interested in:

Indirectly related, Ukraine claims to have captured a T-64BV supplied to rebels from Russian stocks. This is particularly interesting given Ukraine is the only other operator of the T-64 (consistent with 'maskirovka' or plausible deniability?): http://www.janes.com/article/40139/ukraine-captures-russian-t-64-mbt-near-donetsk

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