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Tanker Books/Novels

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I tried to get mine to read it and get them introduced to the YOs course after sub unit command.

 

The lessons from first clash, team Yankee  and brig Patrick cordingly’s in the eye of the storm were extremely useful when acting as the Armour Observer Mentor for Battle Group Training in the UK.

 

Amazing how much of the basics had been eroded by Ops in Afghanistan...

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I daresay, this erosion of know-how was absolutely foreseeable. proficiency in mechanized / combined arms operations requires just three ingredients, practice, practice, and practice, and the troops were getting none of it for at least a decade if not one and a half, and that from an already eroded peak level around ODS. So where is it supposed to come from?

 

 

Well, OK. Simulations must play a bigger role because nobody wants to afford three major annual live exercises on the brigade level. I'm not convinced that simulations can deliver all critical skills, but at least they can reduce the gap towards operational readiness, and help to slow down knowledge depreciation. This is one of the reasons we decided to go the route of high res terrain and high fidelity terminal effects simulation. For many of our customers this has become the only way how they can train this. It's putting a bigger responsibility on our shoulders than I expected to carry, but, well, "rise to the occasion" or something.

Yeah, that must be it. :o

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9 hours ago, CharlieB said:

Amazing how much of the basics had been eroded by Ops in Afghanistan...

"The" war, Vs "A" war.

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9 hours ago, Ssnake said:

Well, OK. Simulations must play a bigger role because nobody wants to afford three major annual live exercises on the brigade level. I'm not convinced that simulations can deliver all critical skills, but at least they can reduce the gap towards operational readiness, and help to slow down knowledge depreciation. This is one of the reasons we decided to go the route of high res terrain and high fidelity terminal effects simulation. For many of our customers this has become the only way how they can train this. It's putting a bigger responsibility on our shoulders than I expected to carry, but, well, "rise to the occasion" or something.

Yeah, that must be it. :o

 

Certainly here.

 

Run the sim 4 or 5 times to get the major kinks out, then do dry trg, then do live trg.

 

With AFVs having limits on Track kms, etc. you need to ensure that the dry / live trg is "confirmatory" as opposed to fixing elementary issues.

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5 hours ago, Gibsonm said:

 

Certainly here.

 

Run the sim 4 or 5 times to get the major kinks out, then do dry trg, then do live trg.

 

With AFVs having limits on Track kms, etc. you need to ensure that the dry / live trg is "confirmatory" as opposed to fixing elementary issues.

Spot on and something I continued to say in my last years when serving.  Can’t waste valuable field time learning stuff. Live confirmation following intensive and continuous simulation, both virtual and constructive to train both tactics and staff...

 

a little off topic....

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If you have a half-functioning brain, it's not difficult to see, really.

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1 minute ago, Ssnake said:

If you have a half-functioning brain, it's not difficult to see, really.

 

Thanks, I think ... ;)

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I suspected as much, but you never know.

Written messages in casual style can easily be misunderstood. Twitter and Facebook wars would happen even if there were no troll farms.

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I didn't see Armageddon's song by Andy Farman (or it didn't show up in the search).

It's a 5 books series (6 if we count the prequel during the Vietnam war) not focused on tanks but there is some"tank" action. The series depict the WW III see by the eyes of multiple characters all over the world. They die quite quickly for most of them since the war is brutal.

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On 7/25/2019 at 10:35 PM, Koen said:

 

Could it be turned into a series of SB scenario’s ?

 

On 7/26/2019 at 10:06 AM, Gibsonm said:

 

Well "Defense of Hill 781" was required reading for me when I was one - submit your book review to the Adjutant for marking.

 

When I became a Squadron Commander and CO I could pass on the tradition to the latest batch of Subalterns. ;)

Just finished reading this one. Despite being written in 88 the debrief points probably read the same for many exercises happening today!!

 

A really good read for anyone wanting an insight to Battle Group (uk term) or Task Force planning tactics and execution.

 

i would make it compulsory reading for Pl (Tp), Coy (Sqn) leaders and HQ staffs! And all the support arms!!

 

The importance of a strong and capable XO (BG 2IC / COS) comes through really strong emphasising the importance of G4 logistics, medical and maintenance.

 

thoroughly recommended.

 

A series of missions. Depends if the ground is accurate to the NTC maps?  Someone more familiar with that terrain and terrain file will know better!

 

what to read next?

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If you liked The Defense of Hill 781, you may also like this other one

 

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If anyone's interested in WW2 stuff, Christer Bergstrom's "The Ardennes 1944-45" is probably the most comprehensive title about the Battle of the Bulge.

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9 hours ago, Ssnake said:

If anyone's interested in WW2 stuff, Christer Bergstrom's "The Ardennes 1944-45" is probably the most comprehensive title about the Battle of the Bulge.

Urghh, I just finished re-re-watching Band Brothers.. The Battle of the Bulge gives me shivers!

 

One book I'd recommend about WW2 is SAS: Rogue Heroes. I think its one of the best comprehensive reads about ww2 in north afrika. I really enjoyed this one.

 

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