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KT is right (hope your Sunburn is better now ;-) )

So, if the Track on the Ground is not "moving", why should it become hot ?

What get hot is the sprocket-wheel(hope thats the right word?)...as there the mechnical energie is transfered into the track with a lot of friction ivolved.

That also heats up the tracks(a tiny bit)...then there is some friction between track and track-pins and well as between track and rollers, the mechnical stress by pulling/pushing when going over or under the rollers...

Overall, the track would be pretty close to ambient or ground temperature.

Edited by Grenny
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Grenny's got it.

If a tank is in the shade of a tree for example and stays there long enough to have it's treads become the same ambient temperature as the ground it's on, but then drives out of the shade and into the hot sun/ground for example, the treads will eventually acquire the temperature of the warmer ground and show up brighter on a thermal imager as well.

You have to imagine the heat being transferred from the warm ground onto the rubber pads, and the metal and other parts that consist of the treads.

Long video but in the first minute on the right side, you can see for example how the cool tire acquired a black hot spot where it was in contact with the warmer pavement when he first drives off with his motorcycle. And then the subsequent heat distribution to the entire tire as he rides on the pavement.

https://youtu.be/uMS74FQkNyU

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The Tracks will ( mostly ) have the same Temperature the Tank has, so no significant higher Temperature as the Rest of the Tank.

Under normal circumstances the Track will be cooler than the Rest of the Tank, because of cooling down while touching the Ground and cooling while moving at high Speed at the Hull side.

The "Temperature Transfer" at the Drive Sprocket is that minimal, that you do not notice it at a TIS...

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We are talking about Tracks, not Wheels!

Grenny's got it.

If a tank is in the shade of a tree for example and stays there long enough to have it's treads become the same ambient temperature as the ground it's on, but then drives out of the shade and into the hot sun/ground for example, the treads will eventually acquire the temperature of the warmer ground and show up brighter on a thermal imager as well.

You have to imagine the heat being transferred from the warm ground onto the rubber pads, and the metal and other parts that consist of the treads.

Long video but in the first minute on the right side, you can see for example how the cool tire acquired a black hot spot where it was in contact with the warmer pavement when he first drives off with his motorcycle. And then the subsequent heat distribution to the entire tire as he rides on the pavement.

https://youtu.be/uMS74FQkNyU

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lol, I know, but tracks have some of the features of wheels. Metal is a great conductor of hot or cold surfaces, same goes for how the rubber parts will acquire the temperature of the surface they are on.

If I could find a video of a tank through thermal, it would look similar to how the rubber tire changes in temperature when it drives on a hotter surface. Just wanted to give you guys a visual reference.

http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/library/policy/army/fm/3-22-37/chap4.htm

Once a target is detected, the gunner must classify the target as either a wheeled or tracked vehicle (Figure 4-24). Different parts of the vehicle give off heat signatures making the classification of a vehicle easier. When viewed through the NVS (WFOV or NFOV), a vehicle's wheels or suspension system quickly heats up.

Wheeled Vehicles. The hubs of wheeled vehicles heat up along with the tires, giving it a distinct heat signature. Based on the vehicles configuration of axles, there may be two or more distinctive round heat signatures just below the hull or body. The engine compartments are normally located at the front of the vehicle. Some wheeled vehicles do not have a gun tube; if it does, the gun tubes are usually small and harder to spot.

b. Tracked Vehicles. The suspension system has road wheels that heat up during movement, usually five to seven road wheels based on the type of vehicle. The engine compartment is usually located in the rear on tanks and the front on armored personnel carriers. These signatures are usually hotter for a longer period of time than the remainder of the vehicle. The gun tube when fired heats up and makes classification of the vehicle easier.

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Not only the running gear heats up with friction, but also with pressure.

On dirt ground the track can sink and offer a maximum surface to spread the weight of the tank. (in addition the ground will act as a coolant for the most hot areas)

On roads, the tracks have a limited contact surface so the weight is more concentrated on the trackpads.

Overall, the trackpads, the rubber bands on the inside and the tracklinks are hot.

The problem with thermals is : "Where is the focus?"

If the focus is on a cold area, the tracks will appear extremely hot.

If the focus is on a hot surface, you can notice that the tracks are not hot everywhere.

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Our assumption is that they are being driven more than just a few hundred meters. Also, tracks with rubber pads heat up faster because of the constant deformation of each pad. Steel tracks will probably not warm up as much, and shed the heat energy faster (heat conduction) than rubber does.

In any case, we don't have extensive sets of thermal signatures for each and every vehicle that we simulate, so there is a certain dose of "artist's impression" in it like on NASA paintings of faraway planets.

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Our assumption is that they are being driven more than just a few hundred meters. Also, tracks with rubber pads heat up faster because of the constant deformation of each pad. Steel tracks will probably not warm up as much, and shed the heat energy faster (heat conduction) than rubber does.

In any case, we don't have extensive sets of thermal signatures for each and every vehicle that we simulate, so there is a certain dose of "artist's impression" in it like on NASA paintings of faraway planets.

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Mephisto at the Australian War memorial

watch?v=BdiSfmv6WYI

My favourite section of the tank museum in bovington (UK) is the WW1 Hall

It has a fantastic collection of WW1 armour.

They allow visitors to inspect the inside of a mk2/3 they also have a replica built of the Trenches. it really is a great day out.

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Not something you see every day :bigsmile:

So now American civilians can fire anti aircraft guns!!

What does the FAA have to say on that!

That timber target must have looked as big as a barn in the sight, given it was only a few hundred metres away.

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